Cricket Standard Tactical .22

Monday, August 5, 2013

 

The Cricket is a classic bullpup and measures just 27 inches from end to end.

The Cricket is a classic bullpup and measures just 27 inches from end to end.

Wikipedia defines a bullpup as “a modern firearm configuration in which the action is located behind the trigger group and alongside the shooter’s face, so there is no wasted space for the buttstock as in conventional designs.”

I had heard about bullpup airgun designs for some years and had seen some on various forums – including a “bullpump” Sheridan – but had never handled or shot one until the Kalibrgun Cricket Standard Tactical .22 showed up at my doorstep, sent to me by www.airgunsofarizona.com . The Cricket that I tested was fitted with a Hawke 4-12 x 50 AO scope on Sports Match mounts.

To be honest, I had some doubts about the whole bullpup concept. Yeah, sure, it produces a shorter rifle, but the idea of laying my face on part of the action while shooting didn’t seem like the world’s greatest idea to me.

My first impression of the Cricket was that, unlike some of the homebuilt designs I had seen online, it looked professionally designed and executed. The stock is molded from a single piece of engineering polymer, and all the metal bits, with the exception of the trigger and the bolt lever, are finished in black. The Cricket .22 Standard Tactical weighs 7.75 pounds before a scope is mounted and measures 27 inches from end to end.

Those round things in the buttstock below the receiver are holders for extra magazines.

Those round things in the buttstock below the receiver are holders for extra magazines.

At the aft end of the stock is a soft black rubber butt pad, which is separated from the main stock by a white plastic spacer. Immediately on top of the stock at the rear is the receiver, which has a slot for a 14-shot rotary magazine. On the right side of the receiver is the bolt lever and the silver colored magazine control lever or MCL. Below the receiver, in the stock are four holders for additional magazines. Moving forward, there is a large opening that allows the shooter’s thumb to wrap around the pistol grip, which is nearly vertical.

The metal cover surrounding the gauge slides forward to allow access for the fill port.

The metal cover surrounding the gauge slides forward to allow access for the fill port.

Beyond the pistol grip, stock material forms a guard around the silver metal trigger. Forward of that is the forestock which has indentations for gripping on either side. Above the forestock is the air reservoir, which has a large gauge on the end. The metal surrounding the gauge slides forward to allow access for the fill port.

The air gauge is unmarked but green is good.

The air gauge is unmarked but green is good.

Above the air reservoir is the barrel, which is shrouded. Moving rearward, you’ll find two metal supports that serve as mounts for the barrel and a scope rail. To the rear of that is another section of barrel that is bare, and behind that, another barrel mount and the receiver.

The magazine and the MCL, which is the silver lever at left.

The magazine and the MCL, which is the silver lever at left.

To ready the Cricket for shooting, charge the air reservoir with a hand pump or SCUBA tank until the gauge is at the top of the green zone. Slide 14 pellets into the magazine, pull the breech lever back until it locks and slide the MCL back until the probe from the MCL can slide into the hole at the center of the magazine.

The breech lever pulled fully back.

The breech lever pulled fully back.

Next, return the breech lever to the fully closed position and slide the MCL forward all the way and then down. There are two forward positions for the MCL. One allows the magazine to function, and the other does not. And this brings me to basically my only complaint about the Cricket: the manual is terrible. It is poorly written and reproduced. In my view, when you spend 1.5 kilobucks for an air rifle, you should get a decent manual. End of rant; back to our regularly scheduled review. (End of rant; now back to our regularly scheduled review).

Now you are good to go. Take aim and start the trigger squeeze. The first stage requires only 7.8 ounces, according to my Lyman digital trigger gauge and at 13 ounces, the shot goes down range. The trigger is very crisp, and there is a very positive “stop” between the first and second stages.

The shot goes off with a distinct POP which is about as loud as a loud springer. It is not raucous by any means, but you can definitely hear it. This gun would not be your first choice for maintaining stealth while shooting.

The Cricket launches 18.2 grain JSB Exact Heavy pellets at 887 fps (average), and delivering 29.2 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

Accuracy is top notch, and the Cricket seems to be un-fussy about ammunition. With Crosman Premiers, at 32 yards, it delivered a 5-shot group that measured just .675 inch from edge to edge, which works out to .455 inch ctc. With JSB pellets, I got a 5-shot group at the same distance that measured just .75 inches, or .53 ctc.

In addition, I found the shooting position very comfortable, with my cheek resting not on the receiver, but on the bare section of barrel just forward of the receiver.

If you’re looking for a short air rifle that is suitable for hunting, the Cricket Standard Tactical delivers the goods.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

8 Comments

  1. John W says:

    Is there any chance that we could talk you into doing some 10 shot groups at 10 meters?

    1. Jock Elliott says:

      John W.,

      Sorry, no.

  2. Chris says:

    Where can i buy this gun?

    1. Jock Elliott says:

      Chris,

      Ask the good folks at http://www.airgunsofarizona.com

  3. marlon says:

    cricket .25 i took it to 100 yards for the first time and did a 5 shot group and i got a half inch group two pellets in the samo hole. i was using a nikko stirling 50x and has it on 50x no holdover. super accurate. took a pigeon out at 200 yards on the ground with the second shot i had to re-adjust.

    1. Walt Heuer says:

      Marlon
      What pellet are you using to get the accuracy at 100 yards? My cricket .25 is not that accurate even at 65 yards. I am thinking the pellets are the problem.

  4. Rob says:

    My Cricket .25 is very quiet. It is quieter than my .22 Hatsan AT44 QE (which is super quiet).

    Either the .22 Cricket is louder than the .25 or the reviewer is wrong. Perhaps he tested it inside with a hard backstop. When I use the .25 Cricket outside, I can hardly hear it. I fire into the grass to test the noise so you don’t get the thump of 50fpe of lead thumping wood.

    If the Cricket is not a good choice for stealth then what is??? There are very few PCP guns that are quieter than this and plenty that are much much louder

    1. Jock Elliott says:

      Rob,

      Since I haven’t tested the .25 Cricket, I have no basis for comparison. I can tell you that he .177 Marauder and the .177 Walther LGV fitted with the FX modular moderator are quieter than the .22 Cricket.

      Thanks for your comments.

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