The surprising – and fun! – Umarex Fusion

Monday, April 21, 2014
The Fusion with the included scope mounted.

The Fusion with the included scope mounted.

Recently the nice people at UmarexUSA sent me a sample of the new Fusion. It’s a single-shot, bolt-action, CO2-powered, .177 caliber air rifle that will probably sell in the neighborhood of around $200.

As I have said before, airguns that sell for $200 and below can be a decidedly mixed bag. Many, while having appealing features, also have some flaw that diminishes the joy of shooting them. The Fusion, in my experience, does a number of things pretty decently and doesn’t appear to have any terrible flaws in my view. As a result, I like the Fusion a whole lot and really enjoyed shooting it.

The Fusion stretches just shy of 40 inches from end to end and weighs 6 lbs. 1 oz. with the included scope mounted and a couple of 12-gram CO2 cartridges inserted. The entire color scheme of the rifle, with the exception of the silver lettering on either side of the receiver, can be summed up in one word: black.

The butt stock and pad.

The butt stock and pad.

At the extreme aft end is a soft rubber butt pad that is attached to a matte finish black polymer stock. The stock is symmetrical from side to side, which is good news for left-handed shooters, but the bolt protrudes from the right side and there is no provision for switching it to the opposite side. The butt stock on either side has grooves for a kind of faux cheek piece, but it is not moveable or adjustable. The pistol grip comes down at a shallow angle typical of sporting-type rifle and it has a couple of finger indentations on the forward edge.

The safety, visible just above the trigger, looks for all the world like an electrical switch.

The safety, visible just above the trigger, looks for all the world like an electrical switch.

Forward of that is a black plastic trigger guard which encloses a folded metal trigger. Forward of that is the forestock, at the end of which is a black relief valve assembly for the air tube into which the CO2 cartridges are loaded. Above that is the black metal barrel. At the muzzle end of the barrel is a polymer assembly that the package calls the “SilencAir” airgun silencing system. Moving back along the barrel, you’ll find a polymer barrel band, followed by the metal receiver which includes the breech, the bolt, and the bolt handle. On the right-hand side of the receiver, just above the trigger guard, is the slide-type safety, which looks for all the world like an electrical switch.

The Fusion also comes with a 4x scope and rings that must be mounted onto the Fusion by the buyer. While this is a relatively inexpensive, non-AO scope, it is adequate to the task. I found that I could see through it clearly and shoot decent groups with it.

The relief valve assembly, just below the barrel at the end of the forestock, must be removed to insert two 12-gram CO2 cartridges.

The relief valve assembly, just below the barrel at the end of the forestock, must be removed to insert two 12-gram CO2 cartridges.

To ready the Fusion for shooting, you must remove the relief valve assembly and insert two CO2 cartridges. The first one goes in small end first; the second goes in big end first. Umarex recommends putting a drop of RWS Chamber Lube on the small end of each CO2 cartridge and on the o-ring of the relief valve assembly. In section 3 of the Fusion Operation Manual, there are detailed instructions for charging the Fusion and adjusting the relief valve assembly. Anyone who owns the Fusion will do well to read them and heed them.

After loading the CO2 cartridges, pull the bolt back to cock the action and open the breech for loading. This also activates the automatic safety. Load a .177 pellet into the breech, return the bolt to its original position, and move the safety to the FIRE position by sliding the switch toward you. Squeeze the trigger. The first stage comes out at 9.1 oz. After a long pull, the shot goes down range at 4 lbs. 1.3 oz.

The package claims that the Fusion will make 700 fps with lead pellets and 750 fps with alloy pellets. I chronographed the Fusion on a day that was only 58 degrees F. outside, and the gun had been stored in a 55 F. basement. The Fusion launched 7.9 grain Crosman Premier pellets at 612 fps for 6.5 foot-pounds of energy. What’s more, the Fusion was extremely consistent: the high velocity was 613 fps and the low velocity was 612 fps. Since CO2-powered airgun powerplants are sensitive to temperature, I would expect that the Fusion would provide more speed and power on, say, an 80-degree day.

The SilencAir device, at the end of the barrel, reduces the report considerably but does not render the Fusion dead quiet.

The SilencAir device, at the end of the barrel, reduces the report considerably but does not render the Fusion dead quiet.

The package also says the Fusion is “incredibly quiet.” I found this to be a bit of an overstatement. It is certainly a neighbor-friendly report – a muted pop – but it is not dead quiet. I think it is the kind of air rifle you could shoot in a suburban backyard without raising the ire of the neighbors, but it is not perfectly stealthy. It is certainly quieter than other CO2 air rifles I have shot that were not equipped with the SilencAir technology.

I found that I could easily shoot nickel-sized groups at 13 yards with the scope provided with the Fusion, and that it had sufficient power to blow through both sides of a tomato can at 20 yards.

In the end, I can happily recommend the Fusion. It has sufficient power for light pest control duty in the garden, enough accuracy to make backyard plinking fun, and ease of shooting that should please most members of the family.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

Leave a Reply

11 − 9 =