The Brocock Concept Elite – Part I

Monday, May 5, 2014

 

The Brocock Contour Elite

The Brocock Concept Elite

The good folks at Brocock seem to have a different philosophy when it comes to designing air rifles, a philosophy that aims at light, nimble guns that would be easy to carry for a full day afield.

And they seem to be spot on target with the new Brocock Concept Elite, a six-shot .22 caliber pre-charged pneumatic air rifle. The Elite (as I will call it) stretches barely 38 inches from end to end, and with an FX scope and mounts aboard, weighes exactly seven-and-a-half pounds. Naked, the Elite tips the scales at just six pounds 12 ounces.

G12 Brocock Super 6 005

At the extreme aft end of the Elite is a soft rubber recoil pad. It is attached to a decided right-handed thumbhole stock with a raised cheek piece on the left side of the buttstock. Moving forward, there is a landing area for your thumb on the right side just under the aft end of the receiver in case you want to shoot with your thumb in opposition to your trigger finger.

G12 Brocock Super 6 004

The pistol grip is nearly vertical, and there is checkering on either side. Ahead of the pistol grip, hardwood forms a guard around the metal trigger blade. Moving forward again, the slim forestock had checkering on either side.

Above the forestock and extending beyond it is the air reservoir which has a port in the bottom for filling with a special filler probe. The air reservoir ends in an air pressure gauge and is surrounded by a barrel band that clamps to the reservoir and the barrel above. At the muzzle end of the barrel is a screw fitting that can be removed. More about this later. There are no iron sights on the Elite; this is an air rifle that is designed to be scoped.

Moving back along the barrel, you’ll find the receiver. It has dovetails on top, in front of and behind the breech, for mounting a scope. On the left side of the receiver is a rectangular protuberance, which I presume houses some of the mechanism for advancing the rotary magazine. On the right side of the receiver is the breech which allows the rotary magazine to be slid in from the right side and the bolt, which can be locked into either a forward (closed) or aft (open) position.

The overall fit and finish of the Brocock Concept Elite is, in my opinion, simply outstanding. With the exception of the silver-colored rotary magazine and bolt handle, all the metal parts are finished in semi-gloss or matte black, and the rest (with the exception of the butt pad) is handsome hardwood. This is an air rifle that I think any airgunner would be proud to own and shoot.

There is no safety that I can find on the Elite. Shooters can, of course, keep the gun safe by never, ever, pointing the muzzle at anything that they don’t want to see perforated by a pellet and by keeping their fingers well clear of the trigger except when they are ready to shoot. In addition, a shooter may render the Elite unable to shoot by locking the bolt in the rearward position. With the bolt in that position, it feels to me that there is a magnet that keeps the rotary magazine from falling out of the breech when the bolt probe is pulled all the way back.

Next time, we’ll take a look at how the Brocock Concept Elite shoots.

Til then, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

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