Hatsan Barrage in .22, Part Two

Monday, December 18, 2017

I introduced you to the new Hatsan Barrage in .22 last month and am following up with observations on how it performed on the range.  As far as functioning, there were no misfeeds or problems as long as the pressure in the reservoir doesn’t drop below the threshold where the semi-auto action cannot cycle (below 100 bar).  I did find the trigger pull gritty at first but this has eased a little as the gun became more broken in.  The trigger pull remained around the 7 pound point even after additional break in of the rifle. A wider trigger blade would have made the rifle a bit more pleasurable to shoot over longer sessions.  If there is any adjustability to the trigger pull, it is not spelled out in the manual and would require removal of the action from the stock and I did not go there.

The Sun Optics CQB Tactical scope I paired with the Barrage worked beautifully on this semi-auto pellet launcher as well as giving the overall package an AR type of look.  The multi-adjustable ambidextrous stock made repeatable shoulder and cheekwelds easy and afforded quick, accurate placement of shots when firing this rapid fire rifle.

I ran several different pellet shapes and weights through the Barrage at 20 yards, all with excellent results.  The favorite load was the H&N Coppa-Spitzkugel, a pointed copper clad pellet weighing 16.4 grains.  The results were a hole that could be covered with a quarter with 8 of 10 shots touching each other.  Its second favorite load was the H&N Baracuda Hunter, a domed hollow-point pellet weighting 18.21 grains. The 10 shot group fell within 1 1/16 inch at its widest point.  As for average velocities with these two pellets using 2000 psi average reservoir pressure for each series, the Coppa-Spitzkugel averaged 872.2 fps with an extreme spread of 9.95 and the Baracuda Hunter averaged 841.8 fps with an extreme spread of 13.40.

Being a PCP the semi-auto action is not impacted by rapid firing like you would experience with a CO2 powered airgun as the propellant does not have to convert from a liquid state first.  Velocities remained relatively constant in rapid fire sessions.  This translates to a bunch of lead flying downrange quickly, increasing the fun factor as you watch dirt fly and targets fall.  I noted a variance in the tensioning of the transparent magazine covers so some user adjustment may be necessary with the 3 mags included with the Barrage to avoid feeding malfunctions.

The retail price appears to have dropped a bit from the $1299.99 I reported in my last blog. Please check with our friends at www.airgunsofarizona.com to get specific pricing info.  Hatsan has become serious contender in today’s PCP airgun marketplace and the feedback I hear about their technical support is that it is top notch as well.  If you are a serious airgun hunter and would like the ability to have quick follow up shots on your quarry, the Hatsan Barrage would be a formidable addition to your gun cabinet.

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