About Jock Elliott

Located in upstate New York, I never met a projectile launcher I didn't like. Besides fooling around with airguns, bows, and blowguns, I pick banjo and guitar. I share my life with my wife, son, and a variety of furry creatures.

Posts by Jock Elliott

You don’t see it talked about much in the airgun forums, but many spring-piston air rifles and air pistols – springers – actually burn some of the lubricants in their compression cylinders during the shot cycle. Don’t worry; it’s a normal thing.

Here’s how G.V. Cardew and G.M. Cardew describe it in their book The Airgun from Trigger to Target: “The combustion phase is the phase in which most high powered sporting spring rifles operate. As the piston comes forward on firing, the temperature of the air in front of it rises with the pressure; this very high temperature causes oil, or any other combustible substance to burn, thereby increasing the pressure further, producing enough energy to drive the pellet up the barrel at a very high velocity.”

Further, they proved that the combustion takes place through an ingenious test that they called “The Nitrogen Experiment.” Starting with a .22 caliber Weihrauch HW35, they stripped it, degreased and rebuilt it with the correct amount of lubrication everywhere. They then fired it through a chronograph until it settled down at 636 fps with a 14.4 grain pellet (12.9 fp of energy at the muzzle).

They then placed the HW35 and a supply of pellets in a long plastic bag and sucked all the air out of it with a vacuum pump, leaving it sitting under vacuum for half an hour to remove all oxygen from within the seals and mechanism. The bag was sealed around the barrel and a rubber bung pressed into the muzzle to prevent oxygen from re-entering the gun. After that, nitrogen, an inert gas that does not support combustion, was blown into the bag to make it a manageable size for shooting the gun. The bung was removed and replaced for each shot, and a number of shots were fired. With the HW35 unable to enter the combustion phase of the shot cycle, the gun managed only 426 fps or 5.8 foot-pounds. The Cardews had proved conclusively that combustion is necessary for the proper operation of a sporting springer.

So, a little bit of lubrication is necessary so that combustion can take place. But what happens when your brand new airgun has a little too much lubrication? Check out the chart below.

WhatIsThis

This is the graph of velocities of an airgun that has too much lubrication and has entered into what the Cardews call the “detonation phase,” or what airgunners generally refer to as “dieseling.” Instead of making normal shot-cycle sounds, the shot goes off with a bang, producing the wild variations in velocity that you see above. Often smoke comes out the barrel and there is a characteristic smell. In severe cases, dieseling can actually bow out the walls of the compression chamber and drive the piston backwards with such force that it kinks the mainspring.

Fortunately, it is usually the case that a handful of shots with extra-heavy pellets will drive the excess lubricant out of the powerplant and settle the airgun back into normal operation. Below is the velocity graph of the same airgun after it was shot enough to settle down.

WeihrauchHW4522

The bottom line: high powered sporting air rifles and air pistols require some combustion of their lubrication to operate properly. But there is such a thing as too much. If you find your air rifle or air pistol dieseling, 5-10 shots with the heaviest pellets you have of the appropriate caliber may help to correct the situation.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

 

pie plate massacree 001

Recently I heard from a reader who was responding to my attempt to test the claims made for the Predator Polymag pellet. You can read that blog and the comments that follow here: http://www.airgunsofarizona.com/blog/2011/08/shooting-household-objects-%E2%80%93-a-test-of-the-predator-polymag-pellet.html

In a nice note, Mark, who says he is a professional shooter with over 20 years’ experience, made a number of comments, among them: “Simply if hunting small game you don’t want to punch a little hole through you want a pellet that goes in expands uses all its kinetic energy in the animal and that gives much better quicker kills. I’ve tested these poly pellets along others in .22 and have seen the results they do penetrate and unleash more kinetic energy than most …”

He also said, in effect, that he didn’t think my tests on inanimate objects really proved anything and that if I did some testing on actual rabbit heads I might be surprised at the results. Now, I take Mark’s point: maybe my tests on inanimate objects really don’t prove anything. And, if Mark or anyone is getting really good results with Predator Polymag pellets in the field, that’s all that really matters. If the Polymags deliver the accuracy and lethality you need, the defense calls no further witnesses. Read the original blog carefully and you’ll see that at no point did I say that the Predator Polymag pellets were bad pellets. Instead, I simply couldn’t prove – in my tests – the claims of “incomparable penetration and expansion.”

As to the suggestion that I test on actual rabbit heads, in theory it is a good one, but the practical problems seem daunting: I don’t have a supply of rabbit head available for testing and – even more importantly – I lack the dissection skills to make sense of the results. Nevertheless, Mark had planted the seed of an idea: maybe I should give the Polymag Predator pellets another test to see if I had got it wrong the first time.

So I decided to do some more testing, again on inanimate objects. For outright penetration – the ability to crack a skull – I decided to use a metal pie plate my wife gracious donated to the cause. For penetration in somewhat softer material, I selected a piece of 5/8-inch-thick hard wood. And for penetration and expansion, a thick paperback book that I had purchased at a used bookstore and didn’t care to finish.

The pie plate was thick, enameled, and looked to be pretty tough. To get calibrated as to its ability to withstand penetration, I set it up at 13 yards and launched a 7.9 grain Crosman Premier at it from my high-power .177 caliber Walther LGV. With a clang, the pellet punched through the plate, so I decided to step down in power and brought out my 6-foot-pound FWB 150. Typically, it launches pellets in the mid-600 feet per second range.

The first shot with the FWB150, with a Crosman 7.9 grain premier, dented but failed to punch through the plate. The same thing happened with the Predator Polymag and an RWS Superpoint Extra. An RWS Hypermax alloy pellet, however, punched through the plate with authority.

On the thin wood, the 7.9 Premier, the Polymag, and the Hypermax, when shot from the FWB 150, all lodged themselves near the surface of the wood. When I tried the same pellets launched from the LGV, measuring with a toothpick down the pellet holes, the Crosman Premier apparently penetrated the deepest.

Special note here: shot from the high powered .177 LGV, the Hypermax pellet went supersonic with a loud CRACK! I once kinked the mainspring in a nice German break barrel air rifle while shooting ultralight pellets that went supersonic and caused the rifle to diesel. So unless your air rifle manufacture specifically makes claims for high velocity with alloy pellets (1,200 fps and above), I would avoid shooting ultralight alloy pellets in high power spring-piston airguns.

The one place I can really recommend shooting lightweight alloy pellets is in low-power airguns (such as the Weihrauch HW 30 rifle or RWS LP8 pistol) for pest control at short range where you might want lots of penetration and then have the shot “die” very quickly. And – this should go without saying – only if the pellet delivers the accuracy you need.

Shooting the paperback book with the FWB, the Crosman Premier penetrated to page 131. The Hypermax drilled its way to page 173. I found the red plastic tip of the Predator Polymag at page 198 and the body of the pellet at page 179. The RWS Superpoint penetrated to page 206. All of the pellets caused deformation in the paper pages well beyond where the pellet was found, and none of them – including the Polymag – exhibited any significant deformation or expansion of the pellet body itself.

Just for fun, I also tried shooting the book with a 7-foot-pound .22 caliber pumper rifle that Tim Smith put together for me. Launching a Gamo Hunter round-nose pellet, it penetrated to page 98 in the book.

I sacrificed another thick paperback book to the angry gods of airgun testing, Predator Polymag head-to-head against the RWS hollowpoint. Shooting them through the FWB 150 at 13 yards, I found that the body of the Polymag out-penetrated the RWS hollowpoint by some 34 pages, and the red point of the Polymag penetrated another 12 pages beyond that. There was little deformation to the body of the Polymag while the nose of the RWS pellet had flattened so that it looked like a wadcutter.

Shooting with the high power LGV, both pellets penetrated more than twice as far. The Polymag penetrated 16 pages deeper with the red point three pages beyond that. Both pellets were approximately equally mangled and flattened by their passage through the book. Why the pellets were more flattened by this book than by the first book, I can’t say.

So where does that leave us? First of all, there are clearly more variables to the business of testing pellet penetration and expansion than I have a good handle on. The Predator Polymag may not deliver “incomparable” performance in all cases, but it fares pretty well. So if you are using the Predator Polymag, and if it delivers the accuracy and hunting performance you need, by all means keep using it . . . and, if you like, share with me some of your experiences in the comments section of this blog.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

 

G12 misc and modular moderator 022

A few years ago I conducted an interview on long-distance shooting with a gentleman who is well known in the airgunning community. He offered the opinion that no one would want a silencer on an airgun unless they wanted to do poaching.

I’ve had a few years to think about that statement, and my conclusion is that it is hogwash. Sure, I imagine that there might be some airgunners out there who are poachers and who would want silenced air rifles for that purpose, but among all the airgunners that I have spoken with or met not once has the subject of poaching even been whispered.

On the other hand, I have talked with and met many airgunners who particularly enjoy the special freedom that airguns offer – that is, the ability to shoot legally in many locations where the discharging of firearms is strictly forbidden. Many of them desire air pistols and air rifles with a reduced report to help maintain good relationships with their neighbors.

For myself, accuracy is the thing that attracts me to airguns, and in addition to accuracy I simply enjoy shooting an air rifle that makes as little noise as possible. In general, most spring-piston are much quieter than, say, a .22 long rifle, and most pre-charged pneumatics and multi-stroke pneumatics, if they are not fitted with some sort of sound-attenuation device, tend to be considerably noisier than springers.

Some time ago, I read that Dr. Robert Beeman, former owner of Beeman airguns, had done an experiment in which he had a colleague position himself so that he couldn’t see Beeman shooting. Beeman then fired a springer with and without a sound attenuating device, asking the hidden listener which as louder. The listener apparently found no discernable difference. From this, if I remember correctly, Beeman concluded that sound attenuation devices really didn’t have an impact on springers.

Recently, however, I had the opportunity to shoot a Walther LGV .177 caliber, high-power version, that had been fitted with the FX Modular Moderator. It’s easy to do a with-and-without comparison because all you have to do is remove the screw-on sections that attach to the base piece that is permanently bonded to the barrel.

G12 misc and modular moderator 023

Now, from the factory, the LGV is the smoothest shooting spring-piston powerplant on which I have had the pleasure to squeeze the trigger. If you want the easiest cock, quietest version, go for the .22 caliber 12-foot-pound version. It is simply amazing. But if you want the flattest shooting model, go for the .177 high power. It launches 7.9 grain Crosman Premier Lights (CPLs) at around 930 fps and produces a report at the muzzle that is very similar to the Weihrauch HW80 – a bit of a snap as the pellet exits. Fitted with the FX Modular Moderator, the noise at the muzzle of the LGV .177 high power seems to just disappear. The shooter hears and feels the action of the powerplant as the shot discharges, and that’s it. I like it. It makes an already excellent air rifle even better, and, as an added bonus, the modular moderator extends the length of the barrel assembly beyond the muzzle. I found myself grabbing the modular moderator as a cocking assist handle that, because of the additional length and leverage, reduces the cocking effort.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

Just last night I had an encounter with a fellow who is an experienced hunter, firearms user, and sportsman, and he knows very little about airguns. His lack of knowledge of about airguns about airguns isn’t a rare thing. Most of the experienced sportsmen that I know have very little conception of the world of adult precision airguns. Their knowledge is pretty much limited to what can be found on the shelves of the big-box stores, and there the packaging screams: 1200 feet per second, 1300 feet per second, 1500 feet per second! This leaves the consumer to assume that more feet per second is somehow better, and it does the consumer a gross dis-service in making a buying decision.

So let’s suppose that you think maybe it would be neat to try airgunning, but you really don’t have a clue what to buy.

392-397

First on my list would be a Benjamin 392. This is a solidly made single-shot, bolt-action, .22 caliber, multi-stroke pneumatic air rifle. It is easy to shoot well, delivers enough power for small game hunting or pest control, and with care should last for decades. I would buy one with a Williams peep sight. Scoping the 392, or its .177 caliber brother the 397, is difficult.

Model-34

Next up would be the highly respected RWS Model 34. This is a single-shot, break-barrel air rifle available in .177 or .22 with power enough for hunting or field targe. Like all spring-piston air rifles, it requires some care to shoot well. The build quality is excellent, and the trigger is far better than you will find in the typical big-box break-barrel springer. In addition, the Model 34 is easy to mount a scope on.

HW30S

Third is the Weihrauch HW30S. This is a lower-power break-air rifle that is easy to cock, offers excellent accuracy, and is perhaps the easiest springer to shoot well. Many airgunners I know say it is the last air rifle they would sell. It can be readily scoped, the build quality is outstanding, and it will deliver decades of service with the occasional rebuild. It can be used for pest control and garden defense with careful shot placement at close range.

WAL-LGV-Master

My favorite springer is the Walther LGV. These are break-barrel, single-shot spring-piston air rifles that are easy to cock and incredibly smooth to shoot. With a scope mounted, you could hunt, plink, shoot field target with a huge grin on your face. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend one to a friend.

When it comes to pre-charged pneumatic rifles, it’s hard to go wrong. Virtually all of them will deliver one-inch groups at fifty yards under good conditions with the right pellet.

L1377C

Turning to air pistols, the Crosman 1377c is an excellent starter pistol that people love to customize. It’s a single-shot, bolt-action, .177 caliber pistol that is fun to shoot and can be used for small pest control at close range. The rear sight, however, requires a safecracker’s touch to adjust.

Triumph%20747

If you want pure, accurate, air pistol shooting fun, the Daisy Avanti Triumph 747 http://www.airgunsofarizona.com/Daisy%20Triumph%20747.html can’t be beat. It’s a single-stroke pneumatic pistol that’s wimpy in power and no good for pest control or hunting but highly accurate, and people use them all the time in air pistol silhouette matches.

HW45

If you want more power and a challenge, I suggest any of the Weihrauch HW45 pistols. These are spring-pistol air pistols that are tricky to shoot well but are fun to shoot and master. They also offer enough power for defending the birdfeeder at short range.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

 

 

 

SONY DSC

The folks who shoot air rifle field target are pretty serious about their accuracy. In the dozen or so years that I have been fooling around with adult precision air rifles, I have yet to meet a field target competitor who has his (or her) rifle set up to shoot faster than someplace in the low 900 feet per second range. I get the feeling that many of them (if they are not shooting in the slower, less powerful international class) have their rifles set up to shoot around 930 fps.

The reason for that is pretty simple: 1100 fps is the speed of sound at sea level. As your pellet approaches the speed of sound, it gets into a region of turbulence that screws up accuracy. If you ever saw the movie The Right Stuff, you might recall that scene in which Chuck Yeager breaks the sound barrier, and as his plane approaches it, he gets bounced around by massive turbulence. That turbulence region occurs whether you are approaching the sound barrier from below or are dropping down and through the sound barrier from a higher velocity. That’s why firearms varminters, who pop prairie dogs and woodchucks at long range, make it a point to keep their bullets well above the 1,100 fps from the muzzle of their rifle all the way to the target.

Okay, so what does that mean for you as an airgunner. Answer: you are going to be shooting slower that 1,000 fps and you are going to have to deal with the trajectory of your pellet. So, for example, if your air rifle is zeroed so that the pellet will land exactly where the crosshairs are pointed at 20 yards, at 55 yards, you are going to have to deal with the pellets dropping several inches below where the crosshairs meet.

Some shooters compensate for the pellet drop by spinning the elevation knob a predetermined numbers of clicks to make the shot fall where the crosshairs are pointed. The method that I prefer is to use a mil-dot scope which has multiple aiming points and then map where the shot falls at various ranges on a diagram of the mil-dot reticle. Below is a picture of the reticle map that Hans Apelles prepared for the Northeast Regional Field Target Championship a couple of years ago.

NE Championship and Pistol ft 010

The other factor that air rifle shooters must compensate for is the wind, and that’s where the MTC Mamba scope comes in. It has something called the Small Calibre Ballistic (SCB) reticle that not only has multiple aiming points like a mil-dot reticle, but it also has horizontal extensions on the lower aiming points that allow the shooter to more closely estimate how much to move the point of aim to compensate for the wind.

retSCBcombined

If you use a “windicator” – a feather or a bit of yarn hanging from the barrel of your rifle that indicates the strength of the wind – with some practice, you can correlate the movement of the windicator with how much you have to “stand off” with the SCB reticle. It’s a slick system that works very well.

Even better, scope delivers bright, clear views and is extremely solid built. It is the only scope that I am aware of that has metal flip-up scope covers. It feels like it is built to withstand years of rugged use without a whimper, and I would not hesitate to use one of these on my own field target rig.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

G12 Wolverine 004

To ready the Wolverine B for shooting, pop the cover off the foster fitting under the forestock and fill the 500cc reservoir (that’s the displacement of a decent-sized motorcycle engine!) up to bar using a high-pressure hand pump or a SCUBA tank.

The underside of he forestock showing the Wolverine insignia and the cap over the foster fitting.

The underside of he forestock showing the Wolverine insignia and the cap over the foster fitting.

Next, pull the bolt all the way back so that you can slide the rotary magazine out to the left. Loading the magazine is pretty straightforward. On the back side of the magazine (if you see a full width horizontal groove, you’re looking at the front side of the magazine), there is an indentation at the bottom through which a pellet bay is visible. Push a pellet nose-first into the hole and then rotate the pellet holder portion of the magazine one click to the left (about a quarter of an inch). Load another pellet, click the magazine to the left again, and so forth. Pretty soon, you will have ten pellets loaded (they will be visible through small holes on the back of the magazine).

Slide the magazine into the receiver from the left side, slide the bolt handle all the way forward (this pushes a pellet out of the magazine and into the barrel), and you’re good to go. Take careful aim, flick the safety off, and ease the first stage out of the trigger. This requires just 8.3 ounces of effort. At 1 lb. 15.7 oz., the shot goes down range.

The Wolverine B with the shroud/moderator assembly dismounted.

The Wolverine B with the shroud/moderator assembly dismounted.

Now, before we get to what happens next, an enormous digression. You’ll remember that I mentioned the Wolverine B arrived with the shroud/moderator assembly not mounted on the air rifle. Further, I had heard very good things about the Huggett moderator. What better opportunity to find out how effective the Huggett moderator is than to shoot the Wolverine B with just the naked barrel, then mount the shroud/moderator and shoot it again to observe the difference.

The Huggett moderator is extraordinarily effective.

The Huggett moderator is extraordinarily effective.

So I shot the Wolverine B without the shroud/moderator, and all I can say is: DON’T! Without the moderator in place, this is one loud airgun. Even though Harper valve is efficient at metering the air through the action, the report is loud (not as loud as some of the Korean pre-charged pneumatics that I have shot), and it has a sharp crack to it that reminds me of a .22 long rifle shooting high-speed ammunition.

Slide the shroud/moderator over the barrel and screw it into place and shoot again, and you’ll find all that noise simply goes away. What was a loud and neighbor-annoying report becomes a soft “ping.” It is remarkable, and even more remarkable in an air rifle of the Wolverine B’s power. Take a look at the chart below. The .22 Wolverine gets at least 85 shots out of a fill-up and generates over 30 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. That’s more than enough power to take whatever game you might reasonably want to take with a .22 caliber air rifle.

WolvB22

The Wolverine easily produces dime-sized groups at 100 feet, and I’m willing to bet that, with care and optimal conditions, it will produce similar size groups at 50 yards. The state of the art in today’s pre-charged pneumatic air rifles is so high that it is fairly rare to find a PCP rifle that won’t do dime-sized groups at 32-33 yards and well under an inch at 50 yards.

In the end, I liked the .22 Wolverine a whole lot. It is a big, powerful, accurate, and incredibly quiet air rifle that would make any airgunner proud.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

 

 

 

 

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The Daystate Wolverine is an air rifle that does a lot of things well.

The Daystate Wolverine is an air rifle that does a lot of things well.

What technology is doing with the latest generation of airguns is pretty amazing.

Recently, the good folks at www.airgunsofarizona.com sent me a .22 caliber Daystate Wolverine B for testing. The gun arrived with the barrel shroud, which incorporates a permanently-bonded Huggett moderator, uninstalled. The user has to slip the shroud/moderator assembly over the naked barrel and screw them together. And what the Huggett moderator does for the Wolverine B is pretty spectacular.

The walnut stock is ambidextrous.

The walnut stock is ambidextrous.

We’ll get to that in a little while, but first let’s take a guided tour of the Wolverine B which stretches nearly 44 inches long and weighs 8.1 lbs. without a scope. At the extreme aft end is a soft rubber butt pad which is attached to an ambidextrous Walnut stock crafted by Minnelli in Italy. The hand-finished thumbhole stock features a cheek piece on either side, a nearly vertical pistol grip with the Wolverine insignia on both sides, and a landing pad for the shooter’s thumb on either side in case you want to shoot with your thumb in opposition to your trigger finger.

The trigger, bolt, and breech.

The trigger, bolt, and breech.

Just forward of the pistol grip, there is a black metal trigger guard that surrounds an adjustable silver metal trigger. Forward of that, the underside of the forestock is adorned with the Wolverine insignia, and forward of that, there is an inlet in the stock that contains a black metal knob. Remove the knob, and you’ll find a male foster fitting for filling the air reservoir. Above the foster fitting on the left side of the stock is an air gauge that tells how much pressure remains in the tank. On either side of the stock, just below the receiver, you’ll find the Daystate name and logo embossed into the wood.

At the front end of the forestock is the air reservoir, a 500cc black metal bottle. Above that is the barrel, which is silver metal, and the matte black shroud and moderator assembly slides over it. At the aft end of the barrel is the matte black receiver. The breech, which holds a ten-shot rotary magazine is located roughly in the middle, and there are dovetails fore and aft of the breech on top of the receiver for mounting a scope. At the aft end of the receiver is the silver metal bolt handle, which can be mounted to the right or left side according to the shooter’s preference. Just under the bolt handle is a sliding-switch type safety.

The Wolverine B is equipped with the Steve Harper designed patented “slingshot” hammer and valve train. It uses inertia to mimic the operation of a solenoid-powered valve hammer and, therefore, eliminates the phenomenon known as “hammer bounce.” Hammer bounce is common in conventional PCPs and involves the valve opening and closing after the main discharge, wasting air long after the pellet has zipped down the bore. The Harper valve delivers extremely efficient use of air, a very high number of shots per charge, a flat power curve, an ultra-fast firing cycle and a relatively quiet (for the power level) muzzle discharge. The slingshot system is also remarkably simple and reliable. As a result, Daystate offers the Wolverine B with a three-year warranty.

Next time, we’ll take a look at how the Wolverine B shoots.

Til then, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

G12 Brocock Super 6 008

To ready the Elite for shooting, charge the air reservoir to 200 bar. Pull the bolt back all the way and move it down to lock it in the rear position. Slide the rotary magazine out of the breech and examine it. You’ll see that it is a very simple mechanism: a piece of machined steel with an o-ring around the perimeter. You’ll notice that at the center of the magazine there is a small bump on one side and a larger bump on the other side. With the big bump facing you, slide six .22 caliber pellets into the holes provided for them.

An aside: I love the simplicity of this magazine. There are no mechanisms to hold, no plates to rotate, nothing to fool around with; just make sure you are loading the pellets in the proper direction, and it’s easy. I realize that there are two philosophies when it comes to designing repeater air rifles with rotary magazines. One says keep the magazine simple and have the rifle do the job of rotating the magazine. The other says keep the rifle simple and have the magazine, usually with the help of an internal spring, do the job of rotating the pellets into position. Brocock has chosen the first approach, and it certainly makes life easy for the shooter.

Next, lift the bolt handle out of the rear locking position, push the bolt forward and push down to lock it in the forward position. This pushes the bolt forward and slides the pellet out of the magazine and into the barrel. Take aim, ease the first stage out of the trigger (this takes 1 lb. 10.8 oz. of effort) and squeeze the trigger. At 3 lb. 12 oz., the shot goes down range. The Elite launches 16 grain JSB pellets at an average velocity of 857 fps. That works out to 26 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle, more than enough to harvest lots of small game.

BrocockConceptElite22

The accuracy is outstanding. The Elite easily delivers dime-sized groups at 32 yards.

The standard muzzle end fitting that Comes with the Brocock Contour Elite.

The standard muzzle end fitting that Comes with the Brocock Concept Elite.

The report, however, is a bit booming as you might expect from a pre-charged pneumatic delivering this kind of power. It is not the kind of report that will keep you in good stead if you have neighbors living nearby.

The modular moderator fitted.

The modular moderator fitted.

There is, though, a happy alternative. The good folks at FX have come up with something called the modular moderator, and you can have it fitted to your Brocock Concept Elite when you order it from www.airgunsofarizona.com Mounting it involves removing the fitting at the muzzle end of the barrel and then permanently bonding to it the base section of the modular moderator. You can then screw on as many baffle sections as you like, followed by an end piece. Any time you need to, you can unscrew the baffle and end sections for maintenance and barrel cleaning.

The modular moderator unscrewed to allow access to the barrel for cleaning.

The modular moderator unscrewed to allow access to the barrel for cleaning.

I tried the Brocock Concept Elite with a very modest modular moderator on it (one base section, one baffle section, and one end piece), and it reduced the sound level very considerably. It wasn’t dead quiet by any means, but certainly much more neighbor-friendly. (I rather expect the good folks at Airguns of Arizona can probably tell you how many baffles sections are needed to render the Elite almost silent.)

Yet another aside: you can also order a Walther LGV with an FX modular moderator. It tried a high-power .177 LGV fitted with a modest (base, baffle and end piece) moderator and found it made the LGV almost dead quiet.

In the end, I liked the Brocock Concept Elite a whole lot. It’s light, short, handsome, accurate, and can be made pleasingly quiet.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott

 

The Brocock Contour Elite

The Brocock Concept Elite

The good folks at Brocock seem to have a different philosophy when it comes to designing air rifles, a philosophy that aims at light, nimble guns that would be easy to carry for a full day afield.

And they seem to be spot on target with the new Brocock Concept Elite, a six-shot .22 caliber pre-charged pneumatic air rifle. The Elite (as I will call it) stretches barely 38 inches from end to end, and with an FX scope and mounts aboard, weighes exactly seven-and-a-half pounds. Naked, the Elite tips the scales at just six pounds 12 ounces.

G12 Brocock Super 6 005

At the extreme aft end of the Elite is a soft rubber recoil pad. It is attached to a decided right-handed thumbhole stock with a raised cheek piece on the left side of the buttstock. Moving forward, there is a landing area for your thumb on the right side just under the aft end of the receiver in case you want to shoot with your thumb in opposition to your trigger finger.

G12 Brocock Super 6 004

The pistol grip is nearly vertical, and there is checkering on either side. Ahead of the pistol grip, hardwood forms a guard around the metal trigger blade. Moving forward again, the slim forestock had checkering on either side.

Above the forestock and extending beyond it is the air reservoir which has a port in the bottom for filling with a special filler probe. The air reservoir ends in an air pressure gauge and is surrounded by a barrel band that clamps to the reservoir and the barrel above. At the muzzle end of the barrel is a screw fitting that can be removed. More about this later. There are no iron sights on the Elite; this is an air rifle that is designed to be scoped.

Moving back along the barrel, you’ll find the receiver. It has dovetails on top, in front of and behind the breech, for mounting a scope. On the left side of the receiver is a rectangular protuberance, which I presume houses some of the mechanism for advancing the rotary magazine. On the right side of the receiver is the breech which allows the rotary magazine to be slid in from the right side and the bolt, which can be locked into either a forward (closed) or aft (open) position.

The overall fit and finish of the Brocock Concept Elite is, in my opinion, simply outstanding. With the exception of the silver-colored rotary magazine and bolt handle, all the metal parts are finished in semi-gloss or matte black, and the rest (with the exception of the butt pad) is handsome hardwood. This is an air rifle that I think any airgunner would be proud to own and shoot.

There is no safety that I can find on the Elite. Shooters can, of course, keep the gun safe by never, ever, pointing the muzzle at anything that they don’t want to see perforated by a pellet and by keeping their fingers well clear of the trigger except when they are ready to shoot. In addition, a shooter may render the Elite unable to shoot by locking the bolt in the rearward position. With the bolt in that position, it feels to me that there is a magnet that keeps the rotary magazine from falling out of the breech when the bolt probe is pulled all the way back.

Next time, we’ll take a look at how the Brocock Concept Elite shoots.

Til then, aim true and shoot straight.

-          Jock Elliott