Archive for the ‘Airguns’ Category

Late June 2017. We’ve had a week of glorious sunshine in the South … temperatures in the 80s and a real feeling that we’ve shaken off the cold and blue skies, and summer is heading for Home Farm.

Rain or shine, our bird feeders are mobbed from dawn to dusk. They all take their turn, and, apart from the blackbirds, there’s not too much squabbling. It’s all very British. Then in drops a gang of long tailed tits. Everyone else scatters as they attack the food, hanging every which way on the fat-balls and peanut holders. Then, they are off before you have time to wipe your nose and pull your ear.

Last weekend it was sunny and warm enough to bring out butterflies, bees and a magnificent 4ft long female grass snake which made her way across the front of the house towards an old compost heap where she must have some eggs. It was also warm enough to have a barbecue with some friends. We set up targets in the garden for a bit of airgun fun (airfun?). In pride of place on the ‘range’ was my old Webley Hurricane pistol, handed down by neighbour Stan, a retired Polish WW2 fighter pilot who lived 3 fields’ distance away. Stan was a hoot, There were always laughs, stir, commotion and tales from his old Spitfire days! Stan would concoct his own lemon vodka at home. It was the best. So was he. Anyway, we crowded round the air pistols to choose our ammunition. I’m a big fan of airgun darts at gatherings like these as they’re great fun for all ages. I always buy a minimum of 5 packs of 10 multi coloured darts so I end up with 10 red, 10 blue, and the same numbers of green, black and yellow. It makes it easier for people to have a decent number of their own single competition colour. There’s talk, as usual, of ‘darts affect barrel rifling’ – this is a myth in my opinion. Ask anyone who claims this just how they know it and you’ll hear something vague such as “Oh, well, everyone knows that…”. Well, I’ve never found the slightest damage to barrels which, after all, are made to withstand all manner of wear and tear. It’s the mohair flights which have most contact with the barrel. So, I say load up – and take aim. Our visitors found them a lot more accurate than they thought…and a lot more fun!

Until next time,

Get out and shoot!

Upon crossing the bridge into Arkansas from Oklahoma on U.S. Highway 64, you’ll find yourself in Fort Smith, an historic city with roots going back to a Wild West town on the edge of the Indian Territory.  This is the home of Umarex USA, Inc. and Walther Arms, Inc.  They are subsidiaries of the German firm of Umarex, a conglomerate involved in the airgun and firearms industries since 1972.

Umarex USA/Walther Arms U.S. Headquarters

If you are unfamiliar with the Umarex name, my bet is you are familiar with some of the airguns in their extensive lineup — airguns such as the faithful CO2 BB firing copies of historic firearms in their Legends line, or the awesome replica of the famous Colt “Peacemaker” in both BB and pellet firing models.  The lineup goes on to include break barrels, CO2 and PCP offerings with names like Hammerli, Ruger, Beretta, HK, UZI and, of course, Walther as well as a few other major names in the industry.  Umarex has licensing agreements in place with each of them in order to use the name branding of those companies and/or produce practically exact duplicates of their famous firearms.  Of course, Umarex also produces airguns under their own name that cover all levels of airgunning from entry level to high-end in price ranges that fit just about any pocketbook.

I had the great pleasure of visiting with Umarex USA’s Director of Marketing, “JB” Biddle at their plant when I was in Fort Smith recently.  JB graciously spent the entire afternoon providing me with an in-depth tour of their expansive facility.  Currently the plant is a distribution center, Consumer Services call center and repair depot that opened in Fort Smith in 2010.  The original 117,000 square foot plant was expanded in 2013 to accommodate the opening of the U.S. headquarters of their sister company; German firearm manufacturer Carl Walther Waffenfabrik, in this location.  The expansion was necessary to comply with strict U.S. firearms regulations on storage and tracking of all components considered firearms by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  Some assembly of firearms is taking place at this facility in relation to the repair/recall service.  Plans are in the works to bring more manufacturing in-house from overseas and existing floor space already exists for this expansion.  Offices on upper floors house Sales and Marketing for U.S. operations of Umarex and Walther as well as the Elite Force airsoft subsidiary.  Currently, 90+ full-time employees keep this operation humming.  Some part-time staffing helps during rush periods as well.  Included in that figure for full-time employees are four gunsmiths, one being a master gunsmith.  The repair center was quite impressive with rows and rows of drawers containing tens of thousands of inventoried parts.  An interesting tidbit I learned was that they have provided service on guns made in the late 1800s that passed through the repair center.  Their R&D/Engineering department was equally impressive boasting a large 3D printer capable of producing a full size stock for evaluation as well as an optics center where scopes could be tested/evaluated for quality control.  Of course, all the other necessary measuring and testing equipment was present along with a small airgun test firing range.  The Call Center folks were busy as I passed through and JB commented how each member of the team “lived and breathed” airguns.

Optics testing table in R&D lab

The culmination of the tour was a visit to their 2 lane, 50 yard indoor firing range.  Multiple airguns and firearms were made available to me for test firing and the afternoon flew by too quickly.  One of the guns fired was the new Gauntlet PCP, considered an “entry level” PCP because at $299.00 w/o optics, it provides a welcome addition in that it will be a great help in getting more folks into PCPs that might have held back due to the high costs of PCPs plus the needed accessories for filling them.  Don’t let the price point fool you, this new PCP is an accurate shooter with many bells and whistles on it that you could expect to pay a lot more for.  I really enjoyed shooting the Gauntlet and then they handed me the MP40, a faithful BB firing copy of the WW2 German “machinenpistole” submachine gun.  Running off of two CO2 cartridges loaded along with 90 BBs into the stick magazine, the MP40 allows for full-auto firing.  I had a ball quickly empting the magazine in short order.  Other items fired during our session included the Octane Elite and the Forge air rifles along with the Strike Point single-shot pellet pistol.  All worked flawlessly and, like a kid in a candy store, I wanted to take all of them home!  Look for more in-depth reviews in future blogs.  A couple of the Walther handguns in 9mm were also provided and while I was setting up for the next airgun I was to shoot, some police officers from a nearby town were trying out the pistols before my turn came.

Parts galore

I feel very privileged that being involved in the media opens doors like this so that I can be invited to visit operations like Umarex USA/Walther, Inc. and describe them to readers.  Hopefully I’ve piqued your interest in Umarex products and you’ll check them out on the Airguns of Arizona website: www.airgunsofarizona.com.

Umarex USA indoor range

Brocock Compatto Target

Brocock announce an exciting addition to the Compatto line up.

The new Compatto Target – a regulated Hunter Field Target version of the popular Brocock Compatto.

Developed in conjunction with the Dutch firm of Huma, who over the last 5 years have become renowned for their high-quality precision regulators, the new Compatto Target adds an increased shot count as well as better shot to shot consistency for the more discerning shooter.

By using the highest quality materials such as aircraft grade aluminum-bronze, chrome-moly steel and precision Belleville springs, the Huma regulator has been specially developed in a joint venture to be combined with the patented sling shot hammer system. This combination is able to reduce shot to shot variation to a 1% fluctuation, yet both are proven and reliable systems allowing Brocock to give two years between services.

Depending on the market, the Compatto Target is fitted as standard with the latest ‘anti slip’ soft touch stock finish.

Brocock Compatto Target Diagram

The Compatto Target has been developed to compete in Hunter Field target competitions and at sub 12 foot pounds will deliver 115 shots in .177 caliber with a shot to shot consistency of only a few feet per second – or as good as your pellets will allow.

Caliber

Power ft/lbs

Shots/Fill

177

12

115

22

12

125

22

27

30

25

28

30

Brocock Compatto Target Angle

The new Brocock Compatto Target will be available in the USA soon!  Meanwhile, for the existing Compatto owners, check out our Huma Regulator for Brocock Compatto .177 and .22. We can offer custom install services as well.

Until next time,

Get out and shoot!

From part I you now know about the FX Wildcat in .22 caliber.  Since that post I’ve had a chance to run some pellets through it and as fully expected it doesn’t disappoint.  With a bullpup design, the balance will generally always feel good due to the grip and trigger being in the middle of the stock.  Sporting a solid laminate wood stock and no polymer parts, it feels heavier and more substantial than its 6+ pounds would indicate, but the shooter will appreciate that when putting shot after shot into very small target areas.

The supplied FX optic, a 6-18x44mm unit paired well with this air rifle although I did not prefer it at the higher magnifications as I had more difficulty with getting my cheek weld situated due to the small exit pupil at the higher magnifications.  However, at 6 to 8 times magnification it worked well and, as I alluded to with tongue-in-cheek in the previous blog, the Wildcat did the rest.

It digested everything I fed it with equal aplomb and I it seemed that accuracy appeared to be excellent with both lighter and heavier pellets as can be seen in the accompanying photo where 14.4 grain Crosman Copper Mags pointed pellets landed in a touching group along with 18.21 grain H&N Baracuda Hunter hollowpoints at 25 yards.  Even with my less-than-stellar shooting skills, this was remarkable accuracy.  I also had an opportunity to try out the new Rifle brand Super Mag 18.36 grain pellets.  Rifle is a brand coming out of Brazil and a supplier to the Brazilian Olympic shooting team.  They are a Field Point shape and gave the same level of performance as the others with only one slight outlier, which I’m sure can be chalked up to the shooter and not the pellet.

Light or heavy, the Wildcat liked them both!

As others have said of Fredrik Axelsson, the man is a genius when it comes to designing and building airguns.  The valves he constructs allow for maximum power out of his airguns while providing plenty of shots on one reservoir of air.  By the way, only HPA is to be used in this FX Wildcat, no nitrogen or other gases per the manual.  For example, during one shooting session where 5 strings of full magazines (8 pellets) were fired, less than one quarter of the volume of air in the reservoir was used.  This particular model does not come with a power adjustment like some of the other FX models.

Trigger pull was great, as could be expected.  The average was 14.7 ounces on a very clean break out of the box.  The take up was a little long for my tastes and could have been adjusted with the supplied hex wrenches, but requires separating the action from the stock which I won’t usually do with loaner airguns.

It really is a beautiful airgun and a real pleasure to shoot.  You just can’t go wrong with any FX product and if you want to find out for yourself, or just need to add another to your collection, contact the good folks at www.airgunsofarizona.com.

We asked back a good airgunning friend of ours, who lives in the UK, out in the wilds of East Anglia, for another flavor of life there. Here is his latest post.

May 2017. The weather has been as capricious as ever – a long sunny week followed by cold Arctic northerly winds with an overnight frost that nipped our plum and walnut trees hard. Now it’s heavy rain. Looking up, I half expect to see a USA–style twister heading my way across the damp fields of England. The wildlife is a bit confused by all this, but they carry on with relentless excitement about Spring at Home Farm.

Better times must be on their way, because we have welcomed a rare bird, back to the Farm. Turtle doves used to be prolific in the UK, but changes in agriculture and habitat have had a major impact on these slim, modest and private birds. Numbers are 96% down compared to 1975.

Five years ago, we were very excited when one arrived literally out of the blue. It was the first one in 25 summers. So, this year, we were delighted to welcome back an exhausted turtle dove, just arrived from North Africa. A good feed soon perked her up again though, and she was off into the privacy of the bushes and high hedges we keep here, in defiance of modern farming practice.

Recently we, too, have been traveling. A new Game Fair in the North of England opened its doors for the second time, so we went back to see what’s fresh and exciting in the world of shooting, airguns and hunting. Folk from “up North” can be a bit reserved at times, but underneath sometimes craggy exteriors are fine, friendly, warm-hearted folk. So, we got talking. In the course of our conversations, we were reminded graphically of the importance of Rule #1 in shooting: shoot safely.

We met one fellow on crutches who had nearly lost a foot through the accidental discharge by a companion with a 12 gauge shotgun. Surgeons wanted to amputate but he insisted he keep his mangled foot. A cheerful chap, he’s been hobbling for months to come, alas. We met another, who had lost the muscle from an arm when a shot caught him sideways across his chest. And, very sadly, we talked again of the local 13 year old boy from Suffolk who was fatally wounded by an airgun while messing around with a couple of his friends, both 14 years old. This happened just 20 miles from us, this time last year.

We set out thoughtfully on the long journey back home to our turtle dove, brooding over the importance of always, always, always shooting safely and carefully.

Turtle Dove Turtle Dove 2

 

Until next time,

Get out and shoot!

Daystate has launched the latest and greatest in high power electronic airguns.  Introducing the Daystate Pulsar HP!

Daystate Pulsar HP Synthetic

Daystate Pulsar HP Synthetic with optional scope and mounts.

For more details and ordering information, check them out at:

http://www.airgunsofarizona.com/precharged-pcp/daystate-pulsar-hp-synthetic-bullpup/

By my own admission I am not a great shot, and I believe Fredrik Axelsson has discovered a secret he builds into his air rifles.  I’ve shot a number of the FX models and they are so easy to shoot accurately it seems like they have the built in ability to correct the shooter’s shortcomings.  That is conjecture on my part, but the facts of the Wildcat are it is a sleek bullpup, side-lever cocking design weighing in at slightly over 6 pounds and sporting a 19.7 inch match winning Smoothtwist barrel, all mounted in a very handsome thumbhole stock.  My particular sample came in the gray laminate wood variation and it is impeccably executed, right down to the logo that is laser cut into the forearm.  A walnut version or synthetic “soft touch” coating version are also available.

Another classic from FX

Atop the black anodized receiver sits an 11mm rail for mounting optics.  FX sells their own brand of scopes and my sample was the 6-18x44mm unit with illuminated duplex reticle.  The scope is also adjustable for parallax via a side turret which can be fitted with a large sidewheel.  30mm FX No-Limits adjustable scope mounts provide independent vertical adjustments for the most precise bore alignment when mounting the scope.

A number of companies produce bullpup designs and the biggest obstacle was coming up with a trigger that wasn’t’ really heavy or gritty because of the extra linkages, etc. necessary to place the action so far behind the trigger.  The trigger on the Wildcat was a thing of beauty – crisp, smooth and light.  The curved, smooth-faced match trigger is adjustable for length of pull, pull weight and cant.  The trigger trips the valve driven by a precision air regulator designed to give consistent shots and deliver a large number of high power shots per fill.

The Wildcat uses an 8-round rotary magazine redesigned for easier loading.  The magazine will not accommodate the longer hunting pellets such as Predator Polymags.  Its barrel is fully shrouded, reducing the sound signature to a mild “pop”, which still might be a touch too loud for backyard plinking/hunting in a suburban environment.  The solid rubber buttpad is fixed, and for a gun in this price range my thinking is an adjustable buttpad should be standard equipment. The non-removable air reservoir is mounted below the barrel with a manometer gauge mounted in the end.  A fill port is covered by the rotating collar on the end of the air reservoir.  A male fill probe inserted into the port will give a fill to 3300psi (230 bar).

Business end of the Wildcat

The side lever is directly above the trigger making for easy cocking without having to fully remove the shooting hand from the pistol grip or raising the head from the cheek weld.   Because there is no double-feed prevention on the Wildcat, the owner’s manual recommends leaving the bolt open and only closing it when ready to fire.  A minor detriment from my point-of-view is the manual safety being situated at the rear of the rifle.  I prefer to snap the safety off once the gun is mounted which is awkward to do with the FX.

The Wildcat retails for $1599 without optics.  The FX scope retails for $379 and the No-Limit rings for $80.  It comes with a one year warranty and well done owner’s manual illustrated with multiple quality photographs.  For more information please contact www.airgunsofarizona.com.  Otherwise, stay tuned for part two where I will put the Wildcat through a few paces.

See Part One: https://www.airgunsofarizona.com/blog/2017/02/introduction-to-the-ruger-yukon-air-rifle.html

Ruger Yukon by Umarex

Testing took place on a 75+ degree day with a slight crossing breeze and at 20 yards from a bench.   No ear protection was required because the SilencAir system did as advertised and really made noise in an outdoor shooting session a non-issue (eye protection, however, is always a must!).  Regarding the SilencAir muzzle device/front sight, the shooter must avoid grabbing it when cocking the Yukon.  The red fiber optic rod could be damaged, but more importantly, you could wind up damaging the suppressor unit.  If that happened you would have to send the rifle back to Umarex for repairs.

Not having the chance to put enough pellets through it to really break it in because of a recent spate of  bad weather, the Yukon shot adequately out-of-the-box to take pests at this range.  Being a 9 pound rifle and equipped with the Umarex ReAxis gas ram the recoil is not much of a factor for an adult shooter.   The trigger had a crisp break at a consistent 5 pounds, 13 ounces, although company data indicates triggers are set at the factory to 3 pounds, 3 ounces.  The scope provided with the Yukon is a 3×9 variable with a 32mm objective bell having a duplex reticle.  The reticle was sharp and the image was bright, but the higher magnifications did not provide all that clear of a sight picture.  I tried adjusting the eyepiece and it helped, so it might just be these old eyes.

Velocities out of the Yukon 18.7 inch barrel with pointed HN Excite Spikes (15.8 grs.) averaged 753fps while RWS Superdomes at 14.5 grs. averaged 665fps which is not what I was expecting.  My chronograph registered two errors during the shot string with the Superdomes so there may have been something going on with my chronograph.  RWS HyperMax pointed alloy pellets averaged 859fps, which is only slightly higher than what Umarex rates this rifle at for lead pellets.  I think it may be time for a new chronograph…  More testing with a variety of ammo is definitely in order as none of the ammo in this initial testing appeared to be favored by the Yukon, although it did lean toward the lighter pellets and the RWS HyperMax alloy pellets made a respectable showing.  Excess factory lubrication left in this particular gun caused some dieseling for a number of shots.  I swabbed the barrel prior to the start of my shooting session and multiple times thereafter to try and eliminate the dieseling as quickly as possible.  Because of this I also checked the stock screws and scope mounts regularly to keep everything tight.  Even so, none of the groups were what would be expected from an Umarex gun.  Keeping in mind that springers can be unforgiving, and factoring out the mistakes of the shooter behind the trigger I’m sure the Yukon is capable of excellent groups.  I have it for a while longer and will do a brief follow up soon.

This is definitely an adult air rifle and having to choke up on the barrel to avoid grasping the SilencAir does slightly increase the amount of cocking force applied.  Umarex rates it at 30 pounds of cocking force and as this rifle breaks in more, I’m sure it will get smoother and easier to cock.  The thickness of the wrist of the Yukon is a possible negative for those with small hands.  I have decent sized hands and found that I was just covering the trigger face with the first pad of my index finger without reaching.

The Yukon is a classic looking powerful rifle for an adult looking to hunt varmints or pests or just general shooting.  To obtain one, or any of the other Umarex offerings, navigate over to www.airgunsofarizona.com.

As reports continue to come across from the 2017 IWA show in Nurnberg, Germany, we keep hearing buzz about the FX Crown. So let’s piece together the information in a collective article and share what we know as well.

FX Crown Laminate

FX Crown Laminate with Optional Scope

The new FX Crown air rifle uses a 480cc Carbon Fiber air bottle for its reservoir and refills via a quick disconnect port.  This interchangeable bottle supplies air to the pressure regulator, which is externally adjustable and features a pressure gauge which shows bottle pressure and another which shows the regulated pressure.  This feature alone is useful for dialing up or down your power, but the FX Crown does not stop there!

FX Crown Air Gauges

Crown Air Gauge for Cylinder and Regulator Pressures

The rifle also features a multi-step hammer stroke adjuster, externally adjusted with ball-detent steps.  This allows the shooter to dial in the efficiency and consistency of the shot cycle.  To top it off, the FX Crown also has a Power restriction wheel, which allow the shooter to quickly increase or decrease the power of the rifle while in the field.  This feature is perfect for pest control, where your backdrop can go instantly from a 100 yard open field to a 20 yard enclosed barn, and the power can be limited to ensure safe dispatch of the pests.  It also works well for the back yard shooter, who wants to keep the full power settings, but needs more shots at low power for the afternoon in the back garden.  Needless to say, the FX Crown is fully adjustable, all externally, and it does not stop there!

FX Crown Walnut Adjusters

Hammer Stroke Adjuster and Power Wheel

The Crown comes with a beautifully shaped, Italian made stock available in Walnut or Laminate, each with an adjustable butt pad.  As an upgrade, an adjustable cheek piece is available as well.

Crown Adjustable Stock

Optional Adjustable Cheekpiece

The target trigger is adjustable with an extremely smooth and predicable pull.  The Crown also features a manual safety which is easily switched on/off near the trigger.

FX Crown Safety

Safety Switch on side of stock near trigger.

The FX Crown uses FX’s High Capacity magazine, but inserts at an angle which reduces the height for lower profile scope mounting.  It is also compatible with the standard magazines for those who want ultra low scope mounting.
The FX Crown’s barrel is shrouded in a full length moderator, which can be extended for even more sound moderation, taking the rifle from quiet to extremely quiet!  The advantage of this feature, apart from noise, is that the length can be instantly reduced to put the rifle back into a standard gun case.  And, while we talk about the barrel, we need to call out the biggest feature found on the new FX Crown…the Smooth Twist X barrel!

FX Crown Barrel Shroud

Nearly Silent Barrel Shroud

Building upon the proven Smooth Twist technology, FX Airguns has pushed the design further with the new X barrel system.  The barrels start with a highly polished tube, clear and free of any cuts or grooves.  Using a patented procedure, FX presses the entire length of the OUTSIDE tube with “grooves” that translate through the metal to impart twist on pellets when fired.  This Smooth Twist spins the pellet much like rifling, but it does not cut the lead or leave markings on the pellets.  This makes the pellet more stable in flight and more resistant to air turbulence.  Furthermore, FX has developed this design to allow for a variety of “Twist” rates and the barrel on the FX Crown allows these inner liners to be changed out easily.

FX Smooth Twist X

So, if your new FX Crown arrives, and after tuning the valve, regulator, and hammer you find it shoots exceptionally well with JSB Exact Heavy pellets you are happy.  But, like many other airgunners, if you insist on shooting the heavier H&N Baracuda pellets despite the rifle loving the JSB’s, you can simply experiment with other barrel sleeves that impart different twist rates, and in no time, you have a rifle that suddenly loves the heavier Baracuda pellets!  Never before has a shooter been able to tell the rifle which pellet to shoot best!

FX Crown with Fredrik Axelsson

Photo courtesy of The Airgun Gear Show

But wait there’s more!!!  While you are swapping out your twist rate barrel sleeves, why not jump into a different caliber altogether?  Maybe its time you take your .22 and install a .30 barrel for some high power hunting.  With the Crown design, this is possible!  You simply swap out the sleeve in the Smooth Twist X barrel to .30 caliber, easily change out the bolt probe in the breech, switch out the magazine and you are all set to dial in the power and consistency for the .30 pellet of choice.  Oh, and if you want to further perfect the accuracy, grab a couple alternative twist rates in .30 caliber while you are experimenting!

FX Smooth Twist X

And this Smooth Twist X barrel system is what truly sets the new FX Crown apart in such a unique way!

Now, we know everyone wants to hear more about the length, weight, power, shot count, accuracy, etc.  But that will require some hands-on testing, which we are prepared to do once the rifle arrives here.  That leads us to the big question, which is WHEN??  FX tells us they will deliver the first guns to the USA mid-April 2017.  So, hang in there and we promise to deliver all the information as it becomes available.  Meanwhile, feel free to order yours now to hold your place in line.  We anticipate the Crown to stay on pre-order status for quite a long time, much like its ever popular cousin the FX Impact!

FX Crown Options

Until next time,

Get out and shoot!

Ruger Yukon

The first thing you notice about the Ruger Yukon is the elegant lines of the wooden stock combined with the blued steel receiver.  It reminds you of a fine firearm prior to the proliferation of synthetic stocks.  The wood is a stained straight-grained beech with pressed checkering and a unique black rubber buttpad that has a triangular section wrapping around the toe of the stock.  Incorporated into each side of this triangular area is a medallion with the familiar red Ruger rising phoenix logo.

The Yukon comes with a 5 inch long picatinny rail mounted  for scope attachment and a 3-9x32mm variable scope, rings and lens covers come with the rifle.  A hex wrench is included with the scope rings which also fits the stock screws so you can keep those snugged up for the best accuracy potential of the rifle.  For those who prefer standard sights, the Yukon is equipped with a fixed ramp front sight with a 1 ½ inch long red fiber optic rod as part of the SilencAir suppressor permanently attached to the muzzle.  The rear micrometer adjustable square notch sight is equipped with green fiber optic rods which offer a nice contrast when lining up a shot.  If you want the option to use both, you will have to obtain some see-through rings as the provided rings are the low mount variety.

The unique buttpad on the Yukon

Available in .177 and .22, the Yukon has an 18.7 inch barrel, weighs 9.0 pounds and is slightly over 44 ½ inches long.   It is touted as providing 850fps velocities with lead pellets based on the use of the Reaxis Gas Piston Power System developed by Umarex.  The Reaxis is said to give higher, more consistent velocities with less vibration and less recoil.  This translates to more power and higher accuracy.  In order to realize that higher accuracy potential, the shooter needs to use the “Artillery Hold”.  For those unfamiliar with springers and the Artillery Hold it basically means you cannot have a death grip on the forearm when shooting.  Just the opposite is true and it is recommended to use an open palm or resting on knuckles under the forearm.  This is because springers have a dual recoil impulse – the piston slamming forward to compress the air behind the pellet and the rearward movement as the pellet leaves the barrel.  Cocking effort is rated at 30 pounds and the shooter should refrain from grabbing the SilencAir /front sight when cocking the rifle to avoid damaging the unit.  Also, there is no anti “bear trap” mechanism so it is recommended to keep a firm grip on the barrel while loading a pellet into the breech.

The Yukon comes with a black metal two-stage trigger adjustable for length of first stage travel and has a ribbed face.  Trigger pull is factory set at 3.3 pounds.  The safety sets automatically upon cocking the barrel.  A black metal safety lever with serrated edges resides directly in front of the trigger making it easy to place the rifle in safe or fire mode.  It does take a bit of getting used to because it works backward from most in that the safety lever must be pulled toward the trigger to disengage the safety.  The only real disappointment, and it is minor, is that the trigger guard is made from polymer.  On this quality of a gun I would like to have seen a blued metal trigger guard, but I also understand the realities of keeping costs under control so that they can be passed to the consumer.  The trigger guard did have some sharp flashing along several edges, but that is easily taken care of with a sharp blade or fine jeweler’s file.

Umarex recommends the use of RWS pellets in the Yukon, which Airguns of Arizona carries in stock.  The Owner’s Manual cautions against using felt cleaning pellets or loose patches when cleaning the barrel as they could become lodged inside one of the five chambers making up the SilencAir suppressor and cause damage.  This package is available from www.airgunsofarizona.com for $179.95 and a one year limited warranty is provided with the Yukon.

So, OK, it’s all elegant and nice to look at and all that, but how does it shoot?  I tend to be a rather wordy individual and am sorry to say I’ve used up my allotted space and will save that discussion until next time.  If you have questions in the meantime, please reach out to the knowledgeable folks at Airguns of Arizona or post a reply.  (Follow this link to be taken to the second installment:  http://www.airgunsofarizona.com/blog/2017/03/umarexs-ruger-yukon-part-deux.html)