Posts Tagged ‘Brocock’

Every year in March, the European version of the Shot Show takes place in Nürnberg Germany. IWA, as it is referred to, is where manufactures from all over the world gather to showcase their goods and release the new products that have been painstakingly developed in the previous years and are now ready for public admiration. Factory managers, design engineers, and marketing gurus come together with anxious excitement in hopes that their customers will be equally excited and fill the order books.  The 2015 IWA show brings exciting news to those finding there way to the stands of Daystate, FX Airguns, Weihrauch, and Brocock. These fine factories have each done their work to provide the airgun enthusiast new reasons to add to their collection.

Daystate LTD


The firm that has pioneered the modern day PCP airgun and is credited by most in producing some of the finest airguns made in the world today.  The centerpiece of their new lineup will include the all new Pulsar Bullpup. This all new air rifle has years of research and design experience behind its creation. Specialists from many technologies have been brought together to build this elegant and advanced shooting machine. The Pulsar represents the next generation of quality and engineering for Daystate. Those that are fortunate to own one of these masterpieces will cherish it for years. The Pulsar sports features found on no other airgun such as a built in laser, an all electronic firing system with regulator, three tuned power levels, and a stock crafted by Italian masters that screams quality and elegance with interchangeable components to design the look of your choice.  The four current popular calibers .177 .22 .25 and .30 will be available. The new Pulsar represents a new benchmark in quality and design that will be hard to match.

FX Airguns

FX Wildcat Bullpup

This innovative airgun company has been very busy. The FX factory has moved and expanded into a new larger high tech facility with the most modern equipment and resources for design, manufacture, and assembly to provide the highest quality airgun products possible. The FX design team has worked literally day and night to bring to market the most exciting models ever to come out of the factory. First, the all new Wildcat Bullpup is a high power, light weight, short, and quiet tack driver that sports a FX made synthetic stock. Additionally, the new Impact air rifle ,although a Bullpup by definition, handles more like a AR15 live fire rifle with features such as external adjustable regulator, power adjuster, hammer, and valve adjustments with a quick change system for the caliber of your choice in minutes. The rifle will be available in .177, .22,  .25 and .30 calibers with maximum power of 90 ft/lbs on the big .30. Light in weight, short in length, and with the option of any production AR15 style grip, this new accurate wonder gun will definitely make an “Impact” on the customer’s choice. These two new models represent some of the highest levels of airgun design from one of the worlds best.

Brocock LTD

Brocock Contour XL G6

With the acquisition of Brocock by Diana holdings come fresh energy and investment from this British firm is famous for its production of small light weight rifles and high power field pistols. This year Brocock is proud to announce the new G6 Contour air rifle. This little gem sports an all new Italian made ambidextrous stock with a olive green soft touch all weather coating. The G6 includes top quality build with features normally found only on more expensive units. The list starts with the fitment of a highly accurate Lothar-Walther barrel, a six shot magazine system, and a Huggett moderator that turns the report into barely a whisper. The G6 along with its stable mate Elite models are a first choice for the shooter that desires a light compact quality target and pest control rifle.

Weihrauch Sport

Weihrauch HW100 Carbine Laminate

This German airgun company is world famous for its consistency, quality, and design. For more than 100 years, HW products have been proudly passed down from grandfather to father to son.  With years of experience in old and new world designs, the craftsmen at HW have few peers. HW is pleased to add new stock designs and innovative features to their rock solid line up. HW will continue to perfect the fine HW100 PCP model for the 2015 season.

G12 Brocock Super 6 008

To ready the Elite for shooting, charge the air reservoir to 200 bar. Pull the bolt back all the way and move it down to lock it in the rear position. Slide the rotary magazine out of the breech and examine it. You’ll see that it is a very simple mechanism: a piece of machined steel with an o-ring around the perimeter. You’ll notice that at the center of the magazine there is a small bump on one side and a larger bump on the other side. With the big bump facing you, slide six .22 caliber pellets into the holes provided for them.

An aside: I love the simplicity of this magazine. There are no mechanisms to hold, no plates to rotate, nothing to fool around with; just make sure you are loading the pellets in the proper direction, and it’s easy. I realize that there are two philosophies when it comes to designing repeater air rifles with rotary magazines. One says keep the magazine simple and have the rifle do the job of rotating the magazine. The other says keep the rifle simple and have the magazine, usually with the help of an internal spring, do the job of rotating the pellets into position. Brocock has chosen the first approach, and it certainly makes life easy for the shooter.

Next, lift the bolt handle out of the rear locking position, push the bolt forward and push down to lock it in the forward position. This pushes the bolt forward and slides the pellet out of the magazine and into the barrel. Take aim, ease the first stage out of the trigger (this takes 1 lb. 10.8 oz. of effort) and squeeze the trigger. At 3 lb. 12 oz., the shot goes down range. The Elite launches 16 grain JSB pellets at an average velocity of 857 fps. That works out to 26 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle, more than enough to harvest lots of small game.

BrocockConceptElite22

The accuracy is outstanding. The Elite easily delivers dime-sized groups at 32 yards.

The standard muzzle end fitting that Comes with the Brocock Contour Elite.

The standard muzzle end fitting that Comes with the Brocock Concept Elite.

The report, however, is a bit booming as you might expect from a pre-charged pneumatic delivering this kind of power. It is not the kind of report that will keep you in good stead if you have neighbors living nearby.

The modular moderator fitted.

The modular moderator fitted.

There is, though, a happy alternative. The good folks at FX have come up with something called the modular moderator, and you can have it fitted to your Brocock Concept Elite when you order it from www.airgunsofarizona.com Mounting it involves removing the fitting at the muzzle end of the barrel and then permanently bonding to it the base section of the modular moderator. You can then screw on as many baffle sections as you like, followed by an end piece. Any time you need to, you can unscrew the baffle and end sections for maintenance and barrel cleaning.

The modular moderator unscrewed to allow access to the barrel for cleaning.

The modular moderator unscrewed to allow access to the barrel for cleaning.

I tried the Brocock Concept Elite with a very modest modular moderator on it (one base section, one baffle section, and one end piece), and it reduced the sound level very considerably. It wasn’t dead quiet by any means, but certainly much more neighbor-friendly. (I rather expect the good folks at Airguns of Arizona can probably tell you how many baffles sections are needed to render the Elite almost silent.)

Yet another aside: you can also order a Walther LGV with an FX modular moderator. It tried a high-power .177 LGV fitted with a modest (base, baffle and end piece) moderator and found it made the LGV almost dead quiet.

In the end, I liked the Brocock Concept Elite a whole lot. It’s light, short, handsome, accurate, and can be made pleasingly quiet.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

 

The Brocock Contour Elite

The Brocock Concept Elite

The good folks at Brocock seem to have a different philosophy when it comes to designing air rifles, a philosophy that aims at light, nimble guns that would be easy to carry for a full day afield.

And they seem to be spot on target with the new Brocock Concept Elite, a six-shot .22 caliber pre-charged pneumatic air rifle. The Elite (as I will call it) stretches barely 38 inches from end to end, and with an FX scope and mounts aboard, weighes exactly seven-and-a-half pounds. Naked, the Elite tips the scales at just six pounds 12 ounces.

G12 Brocock Super 6 005

At the extreme aft end of the Elite is a soft rubber recoil pad. It is attached to a decided right-handed thumbhole stock with a raised cheek piece on the left side of the buttstock. Moving forward, there is a landing area for your thumb on the right side just under the aft end of the receiver in case you want to shoot with your thumb in opposition to your trigger finger.

G12 Brocock Super 6 004

The pistol grip is nearly vertical, and there is checkering on either side. Ahead of the pistol grip, hardwood forms a guard around the metal trigger blade. Moving forward again, the slim forestock had checkering on either side.

Above the forestock and extending beyond it is the air reservoir which has a port in the bottom for filling with a special filler probe. The air reservoir ends in an air pressure gauge and is surrounded by a barrel band that clamps to the reservoir and the barrel above. At the muzzle end of the barrel is a screw fitting that can be removed. More about this later. There are no iron sights on the Elite; this is an air rifle that is designed to be scoped.

Moving back along the barrel, you’ll find the receiver. It has dovetails on top, in front of and behind the breech, for mounting a scope. On the left side of the receiver is a rectangular protuberance, which I presume houses some of the mechanism for advancing the rotary magazine. On the right side of the receiver is the breech which allows the rotary magazine to be slid in from the right side and the bolt, which can be locked into either a forward (closed) or aft (open) position.

The overall fit and finish of the Brocock Concept Elite is, in my opinion, simply outstanding. With the exception of the silver-colored rotary magazine and bolt handle, all the metal parts are finished in semi-gloss or matte black, and the rest (with the exception of the butt pad) is handsome hardwood. This is an air rifle that I think any airgunner would be proud to own and shoot.

There is no safety that I can find on the Elite. Shooters can, of course, keep the gun safe by never, ever, pointing the muzzle at anything that they don’t want to see perforated by a pellet and by keeping their fingers well clear of the trigger except when they are ready to shoot. In addition, a shooter may render the Elite unable to shoot by locking the bolt in the rearward position. With the bolt in that position, it feels to me that there is a magnet that keeps the rotary magazine from falling out of the breech when the bolt probe is pulled all the way back.

Next time, we’ll take a look at how the Brocock Concept Elite shoots.

Til then, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

 

The Brocock Contour Super 6 is smaller and lighter than the Brocock Specialist.

The Brocock Contour Super 6 is smaller and lighter than the Brocock Specialist.

Those of you who regularly follow this blog might recall that recently I was pretty pleased with the Brocock Specialist. I applauded the Specialist because, at 6 lbs. 7 oz. with a scope mounted and only 34.5 inches from stem to stern, the Specialist seemed to embody the idea of a lightweight, easy-to-handle hunting rig. As I boxed up the Specialist to send it back to www.airgunsofarizona.com, I thought the subject of lightweight hunting rigs was pretty well closed.

Well, I was wrong. Recently I unzipped another long, slim package from the good folks at Airguns of Arizona to discover the Brocock Concept Super 6, and it – amazingly – is even smaller and lighter than the Specialist. It measures just 32.25 inches from end to end and weighs just 5 lbs. 9 oz. with a Hawke 4 x 32 scope mounted. At the aft end of the Super 6, you’ll find a soft black rubber butt pad that can be adjusted vertically. Forward of that is a hardwood skeleton thumbhole stock that is decidedly right-handed.

Brocock Contour Super 6 002

The forward edge of the pistol grip is nearly vertical and is checkered on both sides. Above the thumbhole is a vertical thumb rest. The wood of the stock forms a trigger guard that encircles a black metal trigger. Forward of that, the forestock tapers gracefully and features checkering on either side. Underneath the forestock is a single Allen bolt that secures the receiver to the stock.

Brocock Contour Super 6 003

Above the forestock is the air reservoir that has a black metal cap on the end that unscrews to reveal a male Foster fitting for filling the reservoir from a SCUBA tank or high pressure pump. Above that is the barrel which is shrouded. At the muzzle end of the barrel is a silver metal space which has a black metal fitting that can be removed for fitting a sound moderator (where legal).

Moving back along the barrel, you’ll find the receiver with has a slot on the right hand side for inserting the six-shot rotary magazine and a silver metal molt.  The bolt has two positions: locked back and locked forward.  On top of the receiver, forward and aft of the breech, are dovetails for mounting a scope. As with the Specialist, the Contour Super 6 has no air gauge and no safety.

To ready the Contour Super 6 for shooting, charge the air cylinder to 200 bar with a SCUBA tank or pump, pull the bolt back and lock it in the back position. You can now remove the rotary magazine and fill it with six .22 caliber pellets by inserting them nose-first into the back of the magazine. Move the bolt up and forward and down again into the forward-lock position to push a pellet out of the magazine and into the barrel. Take aim and squeeze the trigger. The first stage comes out at 1 lb. 12.3 oz; at 5 lb. 6 oz., the shot goes down range.

Brocock Contour Super 6 005

On the Contour Super 6 sample that I tested, I found that the trigger was noticeably stiffer than the Brocock Specialist. Since the rifle arrived without a manual, I do not know if the trigger weight can be adjusted. I also noticed that the report was quieter on the Contour Super 6 than the Specialist. To my ear, it sounds significantly more muted, which would make it more acceptable for shooting in close proximity to neighbors. It is, however, still clearly audible, and if you are looking for an air rifle that will be essentially unnoticeable, the Contour Super 6 would not be the best choice. The more neighbor-friendly report makes sense, because the Contour Super 6 makes about 15.5 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle, compared for almost 20 foot-pounds for the Specialist.

The Contour Super 6 arrived with a target, shot by Kip at Airguns of Arizona at 18 yards, that measured just .5 inches from edge to edge for a 5-shot group. I tried shooting at 32 yards with Crosman .22 Premiers and got groups that measure 1 inch edge to edge, but I think I know why I didn’t get results that were as good as those delivered by the Brocock Specialist. Quite simply, I couldn’t see as well with the 4-power scope as I could with a 10-power scope.

Still, for the airgunner who wants to spend some time afield with a lightweight air rifle that has enough power and accuracy for hunting small game, the Brocock Contour Super 6 offers a delightful choice.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

Previous Post – The Brocock Specialist – A diminutive tackdriver – Part I

The magazine slides into a slot on the right side of the receiver.

The magazine slides into a slot on the right side of the receiver.

To get the .22 caliber Brocock Specialist ready to shoot, unscrew the cap at the end of the reservoir and charge the reservoir up to 200 BAR from a SCUBA tank or high pressure pump. At this point, you will immediately notice one of the things that is missing from the Specialist: there is no on-board pressure gauge. As a result, you will have to use the gauge on the pump or the tank to determine when the reservoir has been filled. In addition, you will need to be aware of how many shots you have sent down range to stay within the shot curve.

Pull the bolt back and lock it in the open position. You can now remove the magazine by simply pulling it out of its slot. Push 6 .22 caliber pellets into the magazine (the side with the center bump faces toward the shooter). It’s super easy: just push the pellets in far enough so that the head of the pellet goes past the black o-ring that encircles the magazine. There is no twisting of a top plate to wind up a spring within the magazine. The cocking mechanism in the gun indexes the magazine, so there are no moving parts in the magazine. As a result, the magazines for the Specialist ought to be very reliable. When you’re done loading the magazine, slide it back into its slot in the receiver.

Lift the bolt out of its locked open position, push it forward, and lock it in the closed position. This pushes a pellet out of the magazine and into the barrel. Take aim, squeeze the trigger. At 15.4 oz., the first stage goes out of the trigger. At 3 lb. 2.7 oz., the shot goes down range with a POP. While the report is not as loud as some of the Korean airguns that I have shot, it is definitely much louder than many of today’s shrouded-barrel PCP air rifles. I guestimate that the report is roughly equivalent to a Benjamin 392 at eight pumps. This is not an air rifle that I would recommend for stealthy shooting in your backyard.

Did you notice what was missing from the sequence I described in the paragraph above? At no point, did I say, “switch off the safety.” That’s because there is no safety. You can render the gun safe by not cocking it after your last shot or by locking the bolt in the open position, but once you have moved the bolt forward and a pellet is in the barrel, there is no way to lock the action and prevent it from firing. There two keys to keeping the gun safe: (A) keep your finger out of the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot and (B) keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction until you are ready to shoot.

The Brocock Specialist launches 14.3 grain .22 Crosman Premier pellets at an average velocity of around 785 feet per second, which works out to about 19.5 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

Here's the 5-shot group that Kip shot at 18 yards.

Here’s the 5-shot group that Kip shot at 18 yards.

And the accuracy? Well that’s an interesting story. When I unpacked the Brocock Specialist, I found included with it a target shot by Kip at www.airgunsofarizona. It said “JSB 15.89 gr., 5 shots, 18 yards.” In the center of the target was a single ragged hole that measured just half an inch from edge to edge. That works out to .28 inch center-to-center. Not too shabby, I thought.

Here's the 5-shot group that I shot at 32 yards.

Here’s the 5-shot group that I shot at 32 yards.

So I charged up the specialist, pulled out my WorkMate, popped a couple of cushions on top of it, and banged off at shot at 13 yards. The Specialist appeared to be holding its zero from when Kip had sighted it in. I moved the target to 32 yards and banged off three groups with the same pellet that Kip had used, the JSB .22 15.89 gr. The best I could do were five-shot groups that measured .75 inch from edge to edge. That’s not a bad showing, but not as good as I had hoped for.

I was about ready to give up when I got that little internal nudge that says: “charge up the gun again and give a try with some Crosman Premiers.” So I did. My second group measured just .5 inch edge-to-edge at 32 yards, the same size as the group Kip had shot at 18 yards. I’ll take that kind of accuracy any day.

Brocock-Specialist22

The bottom line: the Brocock Specialist is a light, easy to handle air rifle that is wickedly accurate. It’s a bit loud for shooting in close proximity to neighbors, but it ought to be just what the doctor ordered for a day afield.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

The Brocock Specialist is less than a yard long and weighs less than 7 pounds with a scope mounted.

The Brocock Specialist is less than a yard long and weighs less than 7 pounds with a scope mounted.

It’s not an uncommon theme: when airgunners want to spend a day or half day wandering the woods and fields with their favorite pneumatic arm, they don’t want to be hauling around a lot of weight. Trudging around with a heavy burden diminishes the experience.

Some time ago, I wrote a blog on “The 7.5 pound hunting rig,” http://www.airgunsofarizona.com/blog/2011/01/the-7-5-pound-hunting-rig.html and while it is not a hard-and-fast rule, 7.5 lbs seems to be about the limit of what many hunters want to tote afield.

The Brocock Specialist easily makes the weight limit. In fact, with a Hawke Varmint 2.5-10 x 44 scope mounted, the entire rig weighs just 6 lbs. 7 oz. In addition, the Specialist stretches just 34.5 inches from end to end. The ambidextrous stock is molded from matte black engineering polymer, and at the aft end, you’ll find a soft rubber butt pad attached to the buttstock. Moving forward, there is a raised cheek piece on either side, but the portion of the buttstock below the cheek piece is simply cutaway, thereby saving weight.

I found the unusual stock well finished and comfortable.

I found the unusual stock well finished and comfortable.

Moving forward again, there is a nearly vertical pistol grip that flares at the end and has molded-in checkering on either side. Forward of that, a piece of black metal serves as a trigger guard, but does not go completely around the black metal trigger. Beyond that, the forestock curves gently upward and has molded-in checkering on either side for improved grip.

Extending from the end of the forestock is the air reservoir, which has a screw-off metal cap at the end. Remove it, and you’ll find a male foster fitting for charging the reservoir with air from a SCUBA tank or a high-pressure pump. A barrel band connects the air reservoir with the barrel above which is fitted with some sort of bull barrel sleeve. Both the barrel and barrel band are finished in black. At the muzzle end of the barrel is a screw-off metal fitting which can be removed so that a silencer can be fitted (where legal). Between the barrel and the metal muzzle fitting is a silver metal spacer.

The pistol grip is nearly vertical.

The pistol grip is nearly vertical.

Moving back along the barrel, you’ll come to the receiver, also finished in black. On the left side of the receiver is a small rectangular protrusion which I presume has something to do with the operation of the magazine. On the right side of the receiver is a rectangular slot into which the six-shot rotary magazine is inserted. Toward the rear of the receiver on the right hand side you’ll find the bolt which has two locking slots – one to hold the bolt closed and the other to hold the bolt open.

The fit and finish of this rifle are excellent, and I found it very comfortable to shoulder and shoot. In addition, I really liked the Hawke Varmint 2.5-10 x 44 scope. It looks to be well built, the optics are nice and clear, and the mil-dot reticle has lots of aiming points. I prefer mil-dot scopes because you can zero them at one range and then figure out what ranges the other mil-dots correspond to. This gives you the option to instantly compensate for the pellet’s trajectory at various ranges. In addition, the side focusing knob was buttery smooth and an absolute pleasure to use.

Next time, we’ll take a look at how the Brocock Specialist shoots.

Til then, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

The Brocock Enigma, left view. There's not much the shooter can fiddle with on this side.

You don’t have to be Einstein to figure out that the Brocock Enigma in an unusual airgun. The moment I clapped eyes on it in its long slim box from Airguns of Arizona, I knew that whoever had designed this air rifle had started with a clean sheet of paper and not a lot of preconceived ideas.

The Enigma measures just a hair under three feet from muzzle to the tip of the butt pad and weighs just 6 lbs. 13.5 oz. without a scope mounted. At the extreme aft end of the hardwood stock is a thick ventilated rubber butt bad. On either side of the butt stock is a cheek piece, making it suitable for both left and right handed shooters. Underneath the butt stock is a stud for mounting a sling.

The right side of the Enigma. The knob for detaching the butt stock is clearly visible at the rear of the receiver. Above the trigger is the safety, the bolt, and (just forward of the bolt) the magazine.

The pistol grip is nearly vertical and is checkered on either side. At the forward end of the butt stock is a large knob with finger indentations. Turn it counterclockwise, and you can detach the butt stock from the rest of the Enigma, breaking it down so that the longest piece is a little less than two feet long. Forward of the knob, on the right side of the receiver, is a lever type safety. Push it up (so that the red dot is exposed) to fire the gun. Push it down (so that the green down shows) to safe the action. Below the safety, at the bottom of the receiver, are the metal trigger guard and gold-colored metal trigger. Also on the right side of the receiver is the bolt and a slot for inserting the magazine.

There are no shooter-activated parts on the left side of the receiver except for the large stock-connecting knob. On top of the receiver is a dovetail for attaching a scope. At the forward end of the receiver is the .22 caliber barrel, which is roughly 18 inches long and has a screw-off end piece for attaching a silencer where that is legal. Beneath the barrel is the air reservoir, which also has a cap that can be removed to access a male foster fitting for filling the reservoir with a high pressure pump or SCUBA tank to 190 Bar.

Underneath the air reservoir and the forward end of the receiver is the hardwood forestock, which has a stud for attaching a sling or bipod (furnished with the Enigma) and an air gauge.

To ready the Enigma for shooting, pull the bolt all the way back and pull the 9-shot magazine out of its slot in the receiver. To load the magazine, line up the opening in the magazine with the hole in the clear cover and drop a pellet, nose-first, into the opening in the clear cover. I found it necessary to poke the pellets with a ballpoint pen to get them to seat full in the green rotary pellet holder below the clear cover.

When all nine pellets have been loaded, insert the magazine into the slot in the receiver so that (a) the flat side of the magazine is vertical and (b) the clear cover is facing toward the buttstock. There is really only one way that the magazine can be inserted into the rifle, but if you are accustomed to magazines where the flat side must face downwards and try to insert the magazine in that orientation, you’ll spend a minute or two wondering what’s gone wrong.

Next, push the bolt forward. This pushes the first pellet out of the magazine and into the barrel. Flick off the safety and squeeze the trigger. The first stage of the trigger is very short and comes out at 1 lb. At 5 lbs. 14 oz, the second stage trips, and the shot goes down range with a resounding boom! Filled to 2800 psi, the Enigma launches .22 JSB Express pellets with alacrity: 30 shots at 895.5 fps or 25.6 footpounds of energy.

The Enigma delivered this 5-shot group at 32 yards.

Despite a report that is louder than I like and a trigger that is heavier than I prefer, the Enigma acquits itself very well on the range. At 32 yards, it put 5 JSB Exact Express pellets into a group that measured just .5 inch edge to edge. That works out to just .28 inch center to center.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

–          Jock Elliott

The Brocock Concept has a whole lot going for it.

Not long ago, on the “Yellow” airgun forum, someone posted a question: “What was the PCP equivalent of the beloved Beeman R7?” The R7 is highly praised by many airgunners because it is relatively light, simple, accurate, and just plain fun.

I think I have found the answer, for me anyway: the Brocock Concept. We’ll get to the particulars in just a moment, but first some background.

Now, if you recall from previous blogs on Brocock, the company was nearly driven out of business by changes in British law. But the folks at Brocock didn’t quit, and they took what could have been a deathblow as an opportunity to get stronger and better. One of the truly smart things they did was to hire the designer from Falcon Pneumatics (now defunct), who promptly designed a new line of precharged pneumatic air rifles and pistols for Brocock. These airguns are all based on a common action and trigger, to which reservoirs, barrels, and so forth are added to produce the desired airgun.

The Brocock Concept is one of those airguns. I tested the .22 version with a walnut stock, and it’s a beauty. It stretches just a yard overall and weighs only 6 pounds without a scope. Starting at the rear of the Concept is a soft rubber butt pad that is adjustable vertically; just loosen a screw and slide it up or down.

The butt pad can be adjusted vertically.

Moving forward, the buttstock is fully ambidextrous, with a raised cheek piece on either side. The pistol grip is checkered with a slight palm swell on either side. At the top of the pistol grip is a depression for resting your thumb while shooting. Forward of the pistol grip is a black metal trigger guard, inside of which is a black metal trigger that can be adjusted for first stage travel and weight. The length of pull from trigger to butt pad is about 14.25 inches.

Just ahead of the trigger guard is a bolt that secures the action in the stock. The forestock is slender and tapered with checkering on either side. At the far end of the forestock is the air reservoir, which has a screw-off cap that protects a male Foster fitting for filling the air rifle. Above that is the barrel, which also has a screw-off fitting that can be removed for fitting a sound moderator where legal.

Just back of the muzzle is a barrel band that secures the barrel to the air reservoir. Moving all the way back along the barrel, you’ll find the receiver, which has dovetails for fitting a scope both fore and aft of the breech. On the right rear side of the receiver is a small lever, and at the very tail end of the receiver you’ll find a small contoured knob that serves as the end of the bolt.

A small lever at the rear of the receiver on the right side releases the bolt.

That’s it: the Concept is about a simple as a PCP rifle can be.

To ready the Concept for shooting, unscrew the end cap on the air reservoir, attach a SCUBA tank or high pressure pump, and charge it to 2900 psi. Depress the small lever on the right side of the receiver, and the bolt springs backward, opening the breech. At this point, you can load a pellet into the breech and push the knob at the end of the bolt to close the breech, but the rifle will not be cocked. (From a practical standpoint for hunters, this means that you can load the Concept without cocking it and walk around all day without worrying that an errant twig might discharge a shot. Then, when you’re ready to shoot, just press the breech lever, pull the bolt all the way back and close the breech, and you’re good to go.)

To cock the action for shooting, from the breech-open position, you have to grab the knob at the end of the bolt and pull it backwards until it clicks. Load a pellet, close the breech by pushing the bolt knob fully forward, and you are ready to launch a pellet. Note well: this rifle has no safety of any kind. When it is loaded, keep your finger out of the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot.

Now, take aim, ease the first stage out of the trigger (this takes only 7 ounces of pressure) and at 1 lb. 3.4 oz, the shot goes down range. The Concept launches JSB .22 Jumbo Express pellets at about 667 fps average, and will deliver about 40 shots per fill (see the chart below). Since this rifle has no gauge for letting you know how much pressure is left in the reservoir, I suggest counting out 40 pellets, putting them in a small container like a pill bottle, and when the container is empty, you know it is time to refill the reservoir.

Fooling around from a very casual rest in my yard, I found that, at 13 yards, I could put shot after shot through the same hole. Not just “sorta” the same hole, I mean the exact same hole. I would be astonished if this rifle can’t shoot dime sized groups at 35 yards and well under an inch groups at 50 yards.

In all, I found the Concept is light, simple, handy, and delightfully accurate. I think a  lot of airgunners will enjoy owning and shooting this air rifle.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

– Jock Elliott


The British government very nearly put the lights out on the Brocock airgun company in 2004. The company, which had been famous for the manufacture of its “air cartridge” airguns, which were loaded with metallic cartridges that had been pressurized with air and loaded with a pellet, had been virtually wiped out by a change in British law.

On 20th January 2004, it became an offence to manufacture, sell, purchase, transfer or acquire any air weapon using a self-contained gas cartridge system, so Brocock could no longer make or sell the product that was at the heart of the most profitable part of its business. Then, in May 2004, it became an offence, punishable by a minimum of 5 years and a maximum of 10 years imprisonment, to even possess a self-contained gas cartridge weapon without the necessary firearm certificate.

But the Brocock folks are neither slackers nor dummies, so they rolled up their sleeves and got to work. One of the smartest things they did was to hire the chief designer for now-defunct Falcon Pneumatics. His charge was to create a new line of precharged pneumatic air rifles and pistols.

The second really smart thing they did was to design one really good basic action that would serve as a modular base for creating a whole line of air rifles and pistols. Starting from an excellent action, they could then swap barrels, reservoir sizes, and valving to produce a full product spectrum that would please a wide range of airgunners.

The new Brocock line of precharged air rifles and air pistols was launched in January, 2009, and the AIMX Atomic pistol is the latest model to fall into my hands. It is very similar to the Grand Prix, which I reviewed earlier, but that Atomic is fitted with front and rear sights.

The Atomic is about a foot long from the tip of the muzzle to the trailing edge of the rear sight or about 13.5 inches measured diagonally from the tip of the muzzle to the lowest rear edge of the pistol grip. Dangling from my Lyman digital trigger gauge, it weighs in at 2 lbs 12 oz.

It has an ambidextrous wooden “stock” with checkering on either side of the pistol grip. The stock overhangs the pistol grip at the rear by about an inch. The trigger guard, which is an integral part of the stock, is wood. The metal trigger is wide and slightly curved. Forward of the trigger guard a single Allen head bolt secures the receiver into the stock and the rest of the stock, which is flattened. flattened.

The air reservoir has a screw-off metal cap, and under that is a male foster fitting for charging the air reservoir from a SCUBA tank or hand pump. Above that is the .177 cal. Barrel which has a screw-off fitting for attaching a silencer where legal. On top of the muzzle end of the barrel is the fiber optic front sight which is surrounded by a cage of metal that protects the sight but also has cut-outs that allow light to reach the fiber optic rod.

In the middle of metal receiver is the opening for the breech. At the rear of the receiver is a metal notch rear sight which is adjustable for elevation and windage. On the right side of the rear section of the receiver, there is a lever, and at the very aft end of the receiver is a knurled knob. Like the Grand Prix, the fit and finish of the Atomic are excellent and very appealing.

Getting the Atomic ready for for shooting is easy. Remove the protective cap on the foster fitting and charge the reservoir to 200 bar/2900 psi. Press the lever at the rear of the receiver down, and the knurled knob springs backward, opening the breech. Pull the knurled knob backward until it clicks, and you have cocked the action. Insert a pellet into the breech, push the knob forward until it clicks to close the breech, and you’re set.

Now, here comes the really nice part: the Atomic has one of the nicest air pistol triggers I’ve shot in a while. At 9.4 oz, the first stage comes out of the trigger. At One pound 7.8 oz, the shot goes down range. It’s crisp and predictable. If you miss, it sure isn’t the trigger’s fault. Filled up to 200 bar, the Atomic will deliver 30 shots, launching JSB 8.44 pellets at an average of 540 fps, which is about 5.8 fp of energy at the muzzle.

At 13 yards from a Creedmoor position I found myself shooting small groups that probably would have been one-hole clusters if I had been using a scope. In all, I liked the Atomic a whole lot. It’s the kind of pistol that just begs an airgunner to take the UJ Challenge.

Til then, aim true and shoot straight.

– Jock Elliott

When I spoke with Nigel Silcock, owner of Brocock Airguns, to find out how his company had scrambled back from the edge of oblivion after the British government banned their cartridge guns, he was forthright about their objectives: “We knew we had to come up with an action, a reservoir, and plan to produce a whole family of successful airguns.”

If you think about it, it makes a lot of sense: if a company can create one really good basic action as a base for their airguns, they can then fiddle barrel lengths, reservoir sizes, and valving to produce a wide range of air rifles and air pistols. And that appears to be exactly what Brocock has done and done very successfully.

The Contour is a compact air rifle that ought to put a grin on a lot of airgunners faces. When I first pulled it out of the box from Airguns of Arizona, I thought: “Whoa! I know a lot of hunters who would love to take this beauty out in the field.”


The Contour measures only 27.5 inches from end to end and weighs just four pounds. No, that’s not a typo; four pounds. I can’t think of any other precision air rifle that weighs so little.

Starting at the back, a soft rubber buttpad that is adjustable vertically is mounted on the skeletonized thumbhole wood stock. Moving forward, a cheek “piece” sits over a large cut out in the buttstock. Ahead of that is the thumbhole, which also has a spot for resting your thumb on the rear of the receiver if you prefer that position while shooting.


The pistol grip has checkering on each side, and “Brocock” is emblazoned on the bottom of the pistol grip. The trigger guard is comprised of wood, and inside the trigger guard is a metal trigger which is wide, slightly curved, and is apparently made out of a single chunk of metal. Moving forward again, you find a single Allen head bolt which secure the action into the stock.

Ahead of that is the forestock, which is checkered on either side. Beyond that, the air reservoir protrudes from the forestock. A threaded metal cap on the end of the reservoir protects a male foster fitting which is used to charge the reservoir from a SCUBA tank or high pressure hand pump.

Above the reservoir is the .22 cal barrel which can be fitted with a silencer where legal. Moving back, you’ll find the receiver, which has an opening in the middle for the breech and dovetails for scope mounting. At the rear righthand side of the receiver is a lever that, when pushed down, allows the bolt to spring backward and open the breech. At the extreme back end of the receiver is a knurled knob which is the aft end of the bolt.

Now, here’s where I get to tell on myself again. When I first shot the Contour, I didn’t read the manual. I just charged it up, pushed the lever that opens the breech, slipped in a pellet, and tried to shoot . . . but the gun just wouldn’t go off! Maybe it has a safety, I thought.

I ran to the basement, pulled out the manual and read. The Contour has NO safety, it clearly said. Then I realized that I had not cocked the action by pulling the knurled knob back until it clicks. I did that, and it shot just fine. In fact, my trigger gauge told me that 10.9 ounces of pressure takes the first stage out of the trigger, and at 2 pounds 4 ounces, the shot goes off.

With a 2900 psi fill, the Contour will deliver 21 shots with JSB 15. gr. pellets. High velocity is 678 fps, low 641, average 661, which is about 15.5 fp of energy at the muzzle. Shooting at 13 yards in my side yard, with Crosman .22 Premiers and a four power Hawke scope, I found that I could shoot the exact spot that I wanted. First I blew out the center of the target, then I concentrated on precision sniping the small fragments of bulls eye left around the center. This is the kind of accuracy that I really enjoy and that would give me confidence in making accurate, humane shoots for pest control.

And if you want to load your Contour and put it on safe for travel in the field, just press the bolt release lever, but this time, do NOT pull the bolt back to cock the action. Now, load a pellet, and close the breech again. Now you’re set up to carry the Contour, loaded, but not cocked. When you want to make a shot, press the bolt release lever, pull the bolt back to cock the action, then close the bolt again. You’re good to go, quickly and easily, and with no fumbling for a pellet.

I think Brocock has another clear winner with the Contour, and I can’t wait to see what they come up with next.

Til next time, aim true and shoot straight.

– Jock Elliott