Daystate HR Huntsman Regal XL in .177 Part II

Monday, June 24, 2019

In part I of my blog on the Huntsman Regal XL you heard me gush about the visual appeal and describe its many features. I gotta admit I’m unashamed to say I’m a fanboy of the Daystate line.

So, how did it perform when I kicked the tires? As to be expected with a high-end airgun, especially a Daystate, exceedingly well. First, it was paired with an MTC Optics Mamba Lite 4-16x42mm scope and SportsMatch High Range mounts with a side parallax wheel available from AofA. A handsome combination that performed very well together.

Let’s talk about the trigger. It is an adjustable two-stage affair that broke at one pound, 4 ounces right out of the box. The movement was smooth as glass and it broke crisply. The user also has the ability to adjust the cant of the trigger face if desired.

The cocking bolt requires a strong pull to cock the hammer spring and that takes a bit of getting used compared to the toggle style side cocking levers on some high-end airguns. The magazine is a rotary spring-loaded unit that is easy to load, even with fat fingers like mine.

Most PCPs on the market these days come equipped with some sort of sound moderator. Daystate now makes their own suppressors in-house and the one fitted to this Regal XL is a carbon fiber model that really does its job. PCP’s in .177 aren’t terribly noisy to begin with, and this one is an absolute pleasure to shoot because of the low report, adding to the shooting enjoyment of this rifle.

The Regal XL seemed to like most of the pellets I fed it with the exception of H&N Rabbit Magnum II 15.74 grain pellets. Possibly because they are so heavy, I can’t be sure. However, I could not get them to group well.  I’m not a great shot by any stretch of the imagination; still, at 75 feet I got some good groups. Close enough that your confidence should be high in using this rifle for pest control with just about any premium pellet. Predator Polymags 8 grain pellets were leaving the barrel at an average of 947fps equating to an energy level of 15.93fpe. They also exhibited the lowest extreme spread between shots out of the group of pellets used. Rifle Brand Premium Pointed pellets of 9.72 grains went downrange at an average of 896fps generating an energy of 17.33fpe. They also grouped well with some shots touching. H&N Baracuda Hunter Extremes at 9.57 grains traveling at 926fps produced 18.23fpe although they spread out a bit more. On a windless day with a better shooter behind the stock, all of the shots would most likely be touching.

Just for comparison, light (5.5 grain) Predator GTO lead-free wadcutters went zipping along at an average of 1068fps. These light pellets also grouped extremely well making this combination of gun and pellet a contender for indoor competitions where lead pellets are banned.

These are definitely airguns you will be proud to pass down to children or grandchildren for their shooting enjoyment (assuming our grandchildren still have the right to own a gun of any type. Support gun rights organizations and vote when the time comes! If firearms are outlawed, airguns will be targeted next. I’ll get off my soapbox now…). The great folks at AofA can certainly assist you in obtaining one of these, or any of the Daystate line, to become one of your family heirlooms.

Refilling the Regal XL from an Omega tank

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