Archive for the ‘Airguns’ Category

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

For some years after their introduction, many manufacturers promoted gas ram air rifles as being unaffected by changes in temperature. The FPS would be pretty-well the same at any temperature, they said.

Is that true? Well, on the basis of some testing I’ve undertaken, the answer is definitely “no”. At least in the cold weather we have here in up-state New York.

I’ve found that here is definitely a change in FPS for gas ram air rifles at different temperatures. And it’s more than you may have thought!

To find out what the change in FPS can be with gas ram air rifles shooting at different temperatures, we used a new .177 caliber SIG ASP20.

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

We shot the ASP20 at a temperatures of both 20 degrees F and at 63 degrees F. In each case, the gun was allowed to “season” at the ambient temperature for several hours before shooting. This meant that gun and ambient temperature were definitely at the same.

Also, we shot the gun slowly – about every 30 seconds – for each test. This was to avoid any effects from the ASP20 heating-up as it was fired. We took 10 shots at both temperatures for each of the six types of pellets. Total 120 shots.

So what did we find?

The answer that – taking the SIG ASP20 as a representative of gas ram air rifles – the gun shot faster, on average, by 1.28 FPS per degree F at the higher temperature.

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

On average, that means approximately 55 FPS difference when the gun was shot at 20 degrees F and 63 degrees F. That is very definitely enough to make the point of impact on the target very different at most ranges.

So if you’re shooting gas ram air rifles, either on the range or hunting, make sure that your gun is sighted-in at approximately the same temperature as for that critical shot. If not, you could miss the target just due to the change in temperature!

Here’s a chart showing how the Muzzle Velocities changed with temperature for different .177 caliber pellets:

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

And here’s the average…

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

So if you’re shooting gas ram air rifles, either on the range or hunting, make sure that your airgun is sighted-in at approximately the same temperature as for that critical shot.

If not, you could miss the target just due to the change in temperature!

The first ever EBR Mexico 2019 has just finished. It was an outstanding success. All the competitors had a great time!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First Extreme Benchrest Mexico Competition

Alvaro López is the owner of Sun City Airguns of Hermosilio Sonora, Mexico. He deserves great credit for promoting, organizing and running this event. That’s Alvaro above, shooting the benchrest competition. He had fun, too.

As with the 2018 Extreme Benchrest competition in Arizona, Daystate and Brocock air rifles made some outstanding scores…

In the 50 Meter benchrest competition, Daystate Red Wolf HP air rifles placed first, second, fourth, sixth and ninth.

The 100 meter benchrest saw Daystate Red Wolf HP guns in second, fourth, seventh and ninth positions. In addition, Brocock Bantam Snipers placed third and fifth.

And a Daystate Red Wolf HP won the Speed Silhouette competition, too, in the hands of Alvaro’s son Sebastian (below).

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First Extreme Benchrest Mexico Competition

EBR Mexico featured Benchrest and Speed Silhouette competitions, with categories for both PCP and Spring air rifles. Prizes were offered to the winners, with up to 20,000 pesos for the winner of the Extreme Benchrest PCP finals.

Here’s the EBR Mexico 2019 winners. Congratulations, gentlemen!!!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

From left to right, they are…

– Gabriel Valenzuela – 65M spring rifle ( Benjamin Trail NP )

– Enrique Gómez – 100M EBR (FX Impact Mkll 30)

– Humberto López – 50M EBR ( Daystate Red Wolf HP 22)

– Sebastian López – speed silhouette ( Daystate Red Wolf 25 HP )

The 50 Meter benchrest competition was closely contested. Humberto López just pipped Sebastian López and Enrique Gómez, as we can see from the results below.

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

In the Speed Silhouette competition, the winners were (from left to right):
– Guillermo Días 2nd place
– Sebastian López 1st place
– Álvaro López 3rd place

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

Of course, the 100 Meter Extreme Benchrest competition was the highlight of EBR Mexico 2019. Those targets look a really long distance away!!!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

The Extreme Benchrest 100 M winners were, from left to right:
– Edgar Escalante 2nd ( Daystate Red Wolf 22)
– Enrique Gómez 1st place ( FX Impact Mkll 30)
– Jesus Rodríguez 3rd place ( Brocock Bantam Sniper 25 )

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition
Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

Great work Alvaro and all the Sun City Airguns team. Let’s hope that this was the first of a long line of annual EBR Mexico competitions!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

If you read Part I you know that the M17 semi-auto CO2 pellet pistol is one awesome replica of the SIG SAUER sidearm adopted by the U.S. Army in 2017. This is the follow up as to how it performed.

SIG Air’s M17 CO2 pistol — exact copy of the Army’s new sidearm

First, the pistol is substantial at 2 pounds. The fit and finish are excellent with stippling on the grip replicating the firearm. The controls and trigger are metal and there is a short M1913 accessory rail on the dust cover.  An ambidextrous safety disengages the hammer and while it was stiff to engage, it was easy to disengage. The front sight appears as if it is drift adjustable, but upon field-stripping the pistol and looking on the underside of the slide the front sight is actually pinned in place. The rear sight is also not adjustable.

As with many replica pistols, the CO2 cartridge and ammunition are contained in the drop-free magazine. Differences between the M17 and other replicas are the Rapid Pellet Magazine (RPM) belt-feed system, the cam lever piercing system and the valve not being part of the magazine assembly. Replicas I’m familiar with have the valve assembly included in the drop-free magazine and no gas is lost each time you drop the magazine. However, the M17 has the valve assembly attached to the frame and the magazine incorporates a self-sealing valve where a tiny amount of gas escapes each time the magazine is released. The system works well and I experienced no leaks. The cam lever piercing system worked flawlessly. No guesswork on how tight to turn a thumbscrew or hex wrench is a welcome advancement in technology. (A caveat: the manual suggests wearing gloves when installing cartridges due to the frostbite hazard. I concur because of an experience when the cam lever slipped from my grip after piercing the tip but before the lever was completely closed. All the gas escaped at once and luckily no harm was done.) The RPM system worked well and other than wishing for younger, more nimble fingers to aid in loading .177 pellets into the belt, reloading goes pretty smoothly.  At a mile above sea level I was getting between 4 and 5 full magazines of twenty pellets from one cartridge. That equates to around 90 shots before velocity drops off significantly.

M17 showing cam lever piercing system

The trigger has a long double-action-only pull at a pleasant 6 pounds, 11 ounces. Also, the trigger does not have a short reset. If this model was incorporated to augment skills of the firearm user, that limitation would have to be taken into account. Keeping in mind this is a modestly priced CO2 replica, some accommodations would necessarily be required.

Experimenting with lightweight alloy pellets the highest velocity achieved was 377fps using SIG Match Ballistic Alloy (5.25grs.) and Predator GTO’s (5.5grs.). Accuracy was lacking so moving to lead pellets helped somewhat. H&N Excites Plinking and Econ pellets weighing 7.3 and 7.45 grains respectively, gave velocities in the 300fps range. Crosman pointed pellets at 7.5grs. shot well as did Rifle Brand Premium Series flatheads at 8.18grs. but this sample gun tended to shoot low. Not that you’d go after prey with these replica pistols, but long pellets such as Predator Polymags will not fit the RPM magazines.

This pistol will sell internationally so the manual contains instructions in 5 languages. I also mistakenly referred to black & white photos in Part I when all the photos are actually color.

The M17 was fun, easy to shoot and quiet so for a one-to-one replica of a new U.S. military sidearm it doesn’t get much better for plinkers and collectors. Oh wait; maybe it does. I understand a SIG ROMEO1 reflex optic mounting plate is coming in the near future! I want to thank SIG Air for providing the M17 gratis. To get your hands on one reach out to my friends at www.airgunsofarizona.com.

BSA PCP air rifles have a long history of innovation and quality. But until recently the best and newest models from this famous British manufacturer were not available or supported in the USA.

This situation is changing, right now!

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

Precision Airgun Distribution has announced that the company is officially importing a range of new BSA regulated PCP air rifles direct from the Birmingham, UK, factory into the USA. That means that they are available from your favorite local dealers – including Airguns of Arizona.

Among these models are the innovative and compact BSA Defiant bullpup. This has a midships-mounted side lever action and sleek walnut stock. The Defiant provides 26 consistent shots of up to 30 Ft/Lbs muzzle energy per fill of the HPA tube.

That’s the Defiant, below.

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

Another interesting model is the BSA Ultra XL. This is a compact yet powerful PCP of conventional configuration. In addition, there’s the BSA Ultra JSR which is designed specifically for younger shooters of smaller stature.

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

The BSA Gold Star SE (above) is bolt action favorite that’s now available with a new, improved match trigger. It comes complete with an adjustable palm rest (or “hamster”) for Field Target shooting. This is another model that will be available through Airguns of Arizona.

All these air rifles will be available in “full power”, US specifications, with Muzzle energies up to 32 Ft/Lbs in .22 caliber.

The exception is the BSA Ultra JSR. This cute little air rifle is power-limited to 6 Ft/Lbs of muzzle energy . That’s due to its mission, which to appeal to enthusiastic younger shooters who are entering the exciting world of PCP air rifle shooting for the first time.

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

“There’s a large demand for BSA PCP air rifles in the USA,” said Robert Buchanan, President of Precision Airgun Distribution. “This is because they combine distinctive design with high quality British manufacture. Now they will be readily available through Airguns of Arizona and Precision Airgun Distribution dealers across the country.”

Simon Moore, the Managing Director of BSA Guns Limited, endorsed this view. “We see a great future for the latest BSA PCP air rifles in the USA,” he said. “The Precision Airgun Distribution dealer network has many high quality, knowledgeable stores. They are a great resource to re-vitalize the BSA brand throughout the country and introduce our outstanding PCP air rifles to a new generation of enthusiastic airgunners.”

BSA PCP air rifles will be available in .177 and .22 calibers. They all benefit from the iconic in-house cold hammer forged barrel manufacturing that’s a specialty of this British airgun manufacturer.

Contact Airguns of Arizona for more details. These BSA air rifles are in stock today!

In 2017 the U.S. Army adopted a special adaptation of the SIG SAUER P320 pistol as the new sidearm to replace the Beretta M9.  The Beretta had served in that role since the mid-1980s and the military was looking for a Modular Handgun System to replace it.  Trials were held and when the smoke cleared (literally!) the SIG came out on top.  Obviously, a huge coup for SIG SAUER of New Hampshire, the U.S. arm of the Swiss-German parent company.  Being a large multi-national corporation has its perks and one of those is the ability to form divisions that make products which compliment your core business.  SIG did just that several years ago to license and sell branded airguns and accessories known as the SIG Advanced Sport Pellet line.  It’s really nice when your parent company owns all the rights to a design because they can copy that design into a new airgun in a very short turnaround time.  By SHOT Show 2018, a 3-D printed prototype M17 was on display.  As of SHOT 2019 it was a production reality that was already shipping to retailers. [Side note: in 2018 SIG SAUER also increased their commitment to the world of airgunning by becoming a charter member of the Airgun Sporting Association, an industry association promoting all aspects of airguns and airgun hunting. (Airguns of Arizona is also a charter member by the way.) Along with that they began to pull all airgun manufacturing back to the U.S. and re-branded as SIG AIR.]

The M17 is a cool .177 replica with even cooler bells & whistles such as an all-metal slide with blowback feature, ambidextrous safety, dust cover rail for mounting accessories, field-stripping capability and the Rapid Pellet Magazine.  For those unfamiliar with RPM, it is the SIG AIR patented belt-feed system.  Holding 20 pellets, the belt rides inside a plastic stick magazine which, in turn, is inserted into the drop-free extended magazine.  The RPM only fits one way in its channel so all the user has to do is avoid loading the pellets backwards by paying attention to the wording molded into the plastic RPM housing.  The CO2 cartridge, along with a clever cam lever piercing mechanism is also housed in the magazine.  Open the lever, drop in a cartridge, close the lever and the magazine is charged.  No hex wrenches to misplace and no exposed wing nuts to fiddle with or spoil the lines of this replica. 

The only operator control that is non-functional is the ambidextrous slide lock release lever.  It is there just to add to the realism as the slide does not lock back.  The take-down lever, however, is operational and the owner’s manual shows black & white photos with text on how to remove the slide and barrel housing to clear a jammed pellet.  The steel barrel is 4.6 inches long and SIG AIR claims a velocity up to 430fps.  The color is called “Coyote” tan and the pistol weighs in at slightly over two pounds. The MSRP is $140 and a one-year warranty is provided. My sample is marked “Made in Japan”, but as mentioned earlier, eventually all airgun production will be in-house in New Hampshire.

Being the windbag that I am, I’ve run out of my allotted space so details on how it performed will have to be in a separate blog.  Airguns of Arizona does not yet have this model listed on their webpage, but if you are a replica collector and can’t wait to get your mitts on one of these beauties, reach out to them and they’ll help you out.

This pistol can be field stripped easily

IWA Outdoor Classics is the major international outdoor industry trade show. It’s held annually in Nuremberg, Germany. As always, Daystate was a major exhibitor, together with its associated brands.

So, let’s take a look at the exciting new products from Daystate, Brocock and MTC Optics that were to be seen on the booth.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

Above we see Robert Buchanan from Airguns of Arizona with the new Daystate Red Wolf Safari that was being launched at IWA 2019. This version of the Red Wolf is distinguished externally by a new brown wood stock with unusually strong surface texture – you have to handle this yourself to understand what I mean!

But the real interest of the lies inside. For this is the first Daystate model to feature the new technologies that the company is developing as building-blocks for future designs. There’s a new Daystate ART barrel and Version 2 of the internal GCU – Gun Control Unit – circuit board.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

The GCU 2.0 system is an electronic control board, battery and other components. It provides infinitely variable control over the opening and closing of the air rifle’s firing valve. This makes multiple power level adjustments available, for example.

Of course, Daystate has been making electronically-controlled air rifles since 2003. The GCU 2.0 system shown at IWA 2019 is the latest iteration of their expertise in digital air rifle control.

Alongside this new control system is the Daystate ART barrel. ART is an abbreviation for Accuracy Research Team. It’s a new barrel system with outstanding claimed accuracy that’s been developed through a collaboration between Lothar Walther, together with shooters from Italy, the UK and Airguns of Arizona in the USA.

The ART barrel features a polygonal bore and slow-twist rifling. Daystate says that this reduces friction and optimizes pellet spin for improved downrange in-flight stability.

The designer of Daystate air rifles is the Italian Adriano Nodari. Here he is showing us the beautiful, limited edition Daystate Genus at the 2019 IWA show. Great work Adriano!!!

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

More new products from the Daystate group to be seen at IWA 2019 include the Brocock Concept Lite, with collapsible stock below…

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

… and the Brocock Bantam Sniper HP in a new laminated stock colorway. Robert Buchanan is delighted with both of them, as you can see!

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

MTC Optics is, of course, another part of the Daystate group. Sales Director Terence Logan showed me two new – and interesting scopes – that were being launched at IWA 2019.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

First was the MTC SWAT Prismatic. This is a fixed 12X riflescope with an extraordinarily wide field of view. In fact, Terence told me that it has the same field of view as a typical 4 x power scope.

With a large 50mm diameter objective (front) lens, the MTC SWAT Prismatic also promises to offer outstanding light-gathering capabilities. With that huge diameter tube, it also requires a very special mount, as you can see from the photograph above.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

The second new scope MTC Optics was showing at IWA 2019 was the 6-24×50 King Cobra F1. This has a first focal plane reticle and side focus parallax adjustment. It’s part of a clear trend towards first focal plane (FFP) scopes that is currently being seen in the airgun optics industry.

The Daystate/Brocock/MTC booth was also completely redesigned for IWA 2019. It had a stylish, minimalist look that focused attention on the new airguns.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition


The booth itself was located in the bright, airy and modern Hall 3A at IWA OutdoorClassics, along with a number of other top-tier players in the outdoor industry, as you can see from the overview below.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

Of course, you can expect to find these new products become available from Airguns of Arizona in the near future!

There’s a steadily-increasing number of First Focal Plane (FFP) riflescopes becoming available. But which is better, First or Second Focal Plane (SFP)?

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Most riflescopes used on air rifles have the reticle in what’s called the Second Focal Plane. But new technological developments are seeing the introduction of First Focal Plane scopes.

So should you choose a First or Second Focal Plane scope?

In the end, it’s down to a matter of personal choice. But – as many airgun shooters are not yet over-familiar with FFP scopes – it’s interesting to compare the effect of reticle placement inside the scope.

To make the comparison, we’re looking at two scopes from Aztec Optics. Apart from the reticle placement, they’re extremely similar. They have the same zoom range – 5.5 to 25 x – the same objective size – 50mm – and the same size tube, 30mm.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Moreover, they both have the same reticle pattern – called the DYND-1. The only really significant difference between the two models is the positioning of the reticle. This makes them ideal to compare that positioning – first or second focal plane.

To make the comparison clear, we took photographs through both FFP and SFP versions of the Aztec Optics 5.5-25 x 50 scopes. Deliberately, we conducted this comparison under poor lighting conditions.

The light was dull and overcast. We also aimed at some almost monochromatic tree trunks to make the challenge greater.

Here’s what we found…

First The Second Focal Plane Scope

Here’s the view through the SFP scope at 8x magnification.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

And here it is at 25 x magnification.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

As you can see, increasing the magnification magnifies the target. But the reticle stays the same size.

Next The First Focal Plane Scope

Now, let’s see the difference between First or Second Focal Plane reticle positioning…

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

This is the view through the SFP scope at 8x. The reticle is somewhat smaller than the SFP version at this magnification.

Now we have the FFP scope at 25x.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Wow, what a difference! The reticle has increased in size in proportion to the target. It’s clear that this makes aiming MUCH easier in these dull conditions.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Now if we switch on the illuminated reticle capability of the Aztec FFP scope, it’s even easier! (Red illumination is also available, should you prefer).

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Most of us know how many reticle graduations (Mil Dot or MOA) to hold over – or under – to achieve a hit at a specific range when sighting through a scope.

But not so many of us have really thought seriously about how the value of those graduations can change when ta Second Focal Plane scope is zoomed. Because they do…

With a conventional SFP scope, this means that a mil dot graduation at 9x, for example, will have a much different value from that same mil dot in the same scope when at – say – 16 x zoom. That difference likely will cause a miss unless you are aware of that change.

The Aztec SFP scope has red marks on the zoom ring at 9x and 18x because these are the magnifications at which the reticle graduations can be used for holdover using Minutes of Angle (MOA).

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

In a first focal plane scope, the effect of a mil dot holdover is the same, whatever magnification is chosen in the zoom range. As we can see below, there’s no red marks on the zoom ring because the MOA graduations work for holdover at any magnification.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

This makes the probability of a hit much higher if you use variable magnifications on your zoom scope.

The main benefit of FFP scopes will be found by hunters. In hunting, it’s often valuable to glass the area at low magnification and then zoom-in for the shot.

That advantage is a huge one where you use varying magnifications in your zoom scope and need to take quick shots.

If you always use use your scope at a fixed magnification, there’s no benefit however. That’s why first focal plane scopes are of little value to Field Target shooters, for example, who always use the same magnification, even though the distance to their target is unknown.

And, if you’re used to Second Focal Plane scopes – as most of us are – it’s a little disconcerting to see how large – and thick – the reticle grows on a first focal plane scope when it’s zoomed-in.

There’s a concern that the thicker apparent reticle till obscure the target or somehow “hide” it.

But these concerns are likely to fade with time and when they’re considered alongside the massive benefit of consistent effective mil dot holdover at any point in the zoom range.

So do you prefer the First or Second Focal Plane reticle? Either way, you can find your choice available at Airguns of Arizona!

The Crosman brand of Velocity Outdoors Corporation released this licensed copy of the iconic Remington 1875 a couple of years back. Officially titled: “Remington 1875/Sheridan Cowboy CO2 Powered, Single Action Revolver”, and listed under the SKU of: “RR 1875”.

The 1875 uses replica cartridges to hold BBs or pellets

I wanted one as soon as I laid eyes on it at the SHOT Show and although it took a little while, it is now in my possession. An all-metal replica in a bright nickel finish with faux ivory grip stocks it has all the classic lines and heft of the original. In deference to modern requirements and lawyers, there is a slide safety switch on the underside in front of the trigger guard and the hammer doesn’t sit flush when at rest. My understanding is that’s related to drop safety.
The hammer must be placed at half-cock to load and unload as on the original. At half-cock the cylinder can manually be rotated to align the replica cartridges with the loading gate on the right side of the gun. An ejector rod is also on the right side and although it functions like the original, the cartridges easily slide out of the chambers when the revolver is tipped up for unloading. A dual ammo gun, it comes with 12 brass colored cartridges; six hold regular BBs and six hold .177 pellets. Ammo is loaded into the back of the cartridge where soft rubber holds it. Make certain the ammo is flush with the back of the cartridge so cylinder movement isn’t hampered. Faster reloads are accomplished by simply placing the ammo into the cartridge without even removing it.
Made in Taiwan for Crosman, the fit and finish are top notch. The plastic grip stocks have a slight yellow caste to resemble aged ivory. They nicely fit the frame with tight joints that don’t belie the fact that the left grip panel pops off for inserting the 12-gram CO2 capsule. Conveniently clipped inside the grip panel is a small hex wrench used to turn the piercing screw.

The 1875 is a dual ammo CO2 revolver

Holding the gun upside down reveals the nail nick and allen screw. The metal was also nicely done all over in a bright nickel finish that makes this a great display piece when not being used to defend the homestead from tin can desperados.
Another touch of realism is the cylinder pin (called “base” pin in the instructions provided) can be released by pressing the black “base” pin screw on the right side, then withdrawing the pin as far as it will go. Caution: it locks when fully withdrawn and the screw is released, but is under spring pressure and will snap back if the screw is pressed. Doing so could possibly damage the pin. While it won’t need much in the way of maintenance requiring cylinder removal, the instructions do cover this in case of a jam. Cocking the action is also authoritative and makes the satisfying three distinct “clicks” like the old Remington revolver.
As it has been extremely cold for some time where I am located and I don’t have an indoor range, the 1875 has not been shot yet. Since I acquired it more for a wall hanger and collectable, I’m in no real hurry. It is not expected this gun will be highly accurate, just a fun plinker for lazy afternoons. Besides, it displays beautifully next to my nickel finish Peacemaker CO2 replica.
Specs: This hogleg weighs 2.3 pounds and is 13.25-inches long. The smooth bore steel inner barrel is 6½ inches long and the advertised velocity is up to 450fps. The gun comes with a one-year limited warranty and has an MSRP of $149.99. My friends at AofA don’t list this particular model on their website, but they do handle Crosman products and I’m sure could order ya one pardner, in case you have the same hankerin I did when I saw this shootin iron. www.airgunsofarizona.com

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

Airguns of Arizona really specializes in high end air rifles from the likes of Brocock and Daystate. But they also sell a wide variety of other airguns – even BB pistols!

And let’s face it, we all like a little fun shooting occasionally! So today we’re looking at a new addition to the range of firearms-replica BB pistols: the Glock 19.

This BB gun has an unique benefit in the eyes of many shooters. It’s a Glock! It’s the first of the long-awaited range of Glock BB-firing replicas. That means a lot of Glock fans will want it. And so long as they accept it as a non-blowback action, they won’t be disappointed.

Non-blowback replica pistols are often regarded as inferior to blowback models. However they usually give an increased shot count and higher muzzle velocity than their blowback cousins. There’s also some evidence that they can be more accurate than replica BB pistols with extreme blowback.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

The Glock 19 BB gun offers great realism, high FPS, strong shot count, very good accuracy and a low price. It’s an an outstanding replica of the iconic firearm. And it’s just $70. How can you go wrong?

The look and feel of the Glock 19 are extremely good. This is an extremely close representation of the Glock 19 Generation 3 centerfire pistol – the compact version of the Glock 17.

Size and shape are all but identical to that of the Glock 19 firearm. Weight is very close, too.

The appearance and finish of the Glock 19 CO2 BB gun are outstanding! At any range beyond about three feet, it’s impossible to tell the difference between centerfire and BB gun versions.

Due to the realistic appearance of this product, handle it as you would a firearm. Do not display it in public or in any place where it could be mistaken for a cartridge firearm!

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

As a non-blowback version, the magazine release operates correctly, as does the trigger safety. But don’t expect the slide, slide release, slide lock, extractor etc to work. They’re fixed moldings.

The back strap of the Glock 19 BB gun is removable for loading 12 Gram CO2 cartridges. However, this deviation in design from the centerfire version is so well executed that it’s not objectionable in any way.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

This removable back strap also holds a folding hex key which is used to tighten the CO2 cartridge retaining screw. That screw is completely invisible in normal use as it’s covered by the base of the magazine.

Here we have another example of very careful and clever design being incorporated into the Glock 19 BB gun.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

Accuracy is very good by BB pistol standards. As remarked earlier, strong accuracy is more common in non-blowback replica BB pistols and the Glock 19 CO2 BB gun conforms to that pattern. You’ll have no problem hitting those soda cans every time at 6 yards. And most of the time at 10 yards, too!

The Muzzle Velocity claim is 410 FPS. We saw a peak 10-shot string average of 412 FPS at 70 degrees F with Crosman Copperhead BBs. The fastest individual shots recorded 420 FPS. This is very impressive performance for a BB pistol.

We know that all CO2-powered airguns shoot faster in warmer temperatures by about 2 FPS per degree F. This means that – taking that 412 FPS average – the expected FPS for the Glock 19 BB gun would be as high as 442 FPS at 85 degrees.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

The Glock 19 gave us an excellent 96 shots before the Muzzle Velocity dropped down to 200 FPS. Again, very strong performance!

Accuracy and Point Of Impact were also both pretty consistent across the range of test BBs, although the Crosman Copperheads just nudged ahead in our testing.

The trigger of the Glock 19 CO2 BB gun is very close in pull weight to that of the firearm original. Glock gives a specification of 6 Lbs 5 Oz for the firearm. The Glock we tested recorded an average of 6 Lbs 4 Oz. It’s tough to get any better than that with any firearms replica!

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

The trigger features Glock’s iconic trigger blade safety. That works well in the Glock 19 BB gun.

BB and CO2 loading has been very well thought-out in this product. The CO2-tightening hex key is cleverly located in the removable backstrap and swivels for use.

There’s an easy-to-use BB follower catch and a well-proportioned BB loading port. Why can’t all BB guns be as easy to load as this?

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

Go on! Treat yourself to a little BB gun fun with the Glock 19. You’ll be pleased you did!

For this report from the 2019 SHOT Show, we’ll take-in new products from Daystate and Brocock. There’s a lot of them and there’s more too…

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

A star attraction was the the new Brocock Patagonia PCP air rifle. This is a full production version of the Brocock Bantam Sniper HP model that was used to win the 2018 Extreme Benchrest by Claudio Flores. And that’s Claudio in our photograph with “his” air rifle. He certainly looks pleased with it!

Brocock had chosen the 2019 SHOT Show as the platform to launch this interesting new model

Why Patagonia? Well, Claudio’s company is called Patagonia Airguns. And this new airgun carries Claudio’s signature on the shroud, as we can see below

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

The Brocock Patagonia is available in both .22 and .25 calibers. There’s adjustable power levels up to 46 Ft/Lbs in .22 and 55 Ft/Lbs in .25 cal. With a Huma regulator, 460 cc carbon fiber HPA bottle and new 0dB silencer, this is the premier model in the semi-bullpup Brocock Bantam line

Meanwhile, Lauren Parsons shows us both Brocock Commander and Patagonia models

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

… and Tony Belas previews the Bantam Sniper Mini version of Brocock’s versatile Bantam range.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

Another new model seen on the Daystate/Brocock booth at the 2019 SHOT Show was a new version of the Daystate Pulsar. This electronically-controlled bullpup PCP has been equipped with the laminated hardwood colorway first seen on the Daystate Saxon limited edition model form a couple of years ago.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

Greg Glover shows us this to us. Again, the new Daystate 0dB silencer is fitted to further mute this shrouded air rifle’s report.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)
The water cooled Omega TrailCharger also takes an innovative approach to managing the connecting cables, as is visible in this rear view.

Another interesting new product to be seen at the Daystate/Brocock booth at the 2019 SHOT Show was this new Omega Trailcharger HPA compressor. It’s imported into the US by Airguns of Arizona.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

This compressor is can be powered by mains electricity (using the supplied transformer) or from a vehicle 12 Volt DC battery. Unlike most similar portable HPA compressors, however, it’s designed to be able to fill HPA tanks and not just PCP airguns directly. The Street Price will be $799, which is attractive for an HPA compressor of this capability

The water cooled Omega TrailCharger also takes an innovative approach to managing the connecting cables, as is visible in the rear view, above.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

As we can see from the photograph above, the TrailCharger is considerably smaller and lighter than the well-known Omega TurboCharger which sits next to it on the right.

Phew! That’s lots of new stuff. Look for it to become available from Airguns of Arizona in the near future…