Posts by Stephen Archer

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

Yes, the Diana Outlaw PCP air rifle is good! I found it very easy and comfortable to shoot. 

At a Street Price of $499.99, the Outlaw is priced between the rash of $300 PCPs and the more traditional $1,000-ish starting point for the premium brands.

Probably the Benjamin Marauder is the gun to beat at the price. Compared to the Outlaw, the Marauder has a better trigger, is quieter and can’t be blank-fired with a magazine in place. But the Diana has a far more consistent regulated shot count, side lever action and more sophisticated looks.

In itself, this comparison to the Marauder means that the Diana Outlaw offers very good value for money. That’s always been the Marauder’s strong suit and the Outlaw clearly trades punches with the long-established champion in performance, value and quality.

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

The stock design worked well for me, even though there is no adjustable buttpad or cheekpiece, as is now becoming common in similarly-priced PCP air rifles.

The Outlaw has a two-stage trigger. Sear release is predictable and the overall effect quite pleasant. Pull weight averaged a comfortable 1 Lb 11 Oz on test.

The cocking lever works well and easily. Again, it’s less slick than that of more expensive PCPs, but it’s definitely better than any bolt action I can think of. 

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

There was a definite roughness in chambering some pellets, primarily the alloys, FTTs and Baracudas. However, that clearly made no difference to accuracy so far as the heavier H&N pellets were concerned. Heavy, 21.14 Grain H&N Baracuda Match pellets turned-in the best accuracy of any I shot!

At 25 Yards, the 10-shot test group was very respectable at about 0.3-Inches center-to-center using a scope at 9X magnification.

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

Muzzle Energy also peaked at 31.11 Ft/Lbs with Baracudas. However, it’s likely that many owners of the Diana Outlaw will choose to shoot mid-weight lead pellets in the 14 – 15 Grain range, they will see a Muzzle Energy of around 28 – 29 Ft/Lbs. That’s fine for much airgun hunting.

Accuracy was very good or better with 14.3 Grain and heavier pellets. As is frequently the case with quality PCP air rifles, the lighter pellets did not perform so well.

The Diana Outlaw has a regulated action. I tested this using JSB-manufactured Daystate Rangemaster, 15.9 Grain pellets. The result was a good, consistent Muzzle Velocity for 49 shots. 

From shot 50, pressure had fallen sufficiently that the regulator was no longer activated. The FPS then dropped steadily from shot-to-shot, as is expected and you can see in the graph below.

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

The top of the breech is grooved with standard airgun dovetails. As there’s minimal recoil when firing, a Weaver/Picatinny mount is not required.

The magazine does protrude above the top of the breech. However, there’s still sufficient clearance for the scope above the clip, even when using medium height rings.

One issue is that the magazine is loaded from the left side of the gun. This may cause issues with large diameter scope sidewheels, so the new owner should check this aspect before selecting a scope.

Weight of the Outlaw I tested was 6 Lbs 10 Oz without scope. This compares to the 7 Lbs 5 Oz of a synthetic Marauder. 

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

This relatively light weight and svelte size of the Outlaw means that a mid-size scope – like an Aztec Emerald – is ideal. Bigger, heavier scopes run the risk of making the rig top heavy. 

The Outlaw’s magazine is an interesting, quite complex design. It has an 11-shot capacity in .22 caliber, one more than many competitive products. It feels robust and substantial in construction. 

It’s also easy to load without the need to hold back a sprung cover plate, as is often the case with other rotary magazines, due to an internal ratcheting system.

However, it does not block the action when all pellets are used and there’s no pellet counter. This means that it’s necessary to keep count of the shots fired to avoid a blank discharge.

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

The magazine worked well in testing. It slides easily and slickly into the breech, being retained in place by a magnet. Capacity is 13 pellets in .177 cal, 11 in .22 and 9 pellets in .25 caliber.

The Outlaw is an attractive air rifle with an elegant look. Machining finish is very good, with most metal parts having a uniform, black matt  finish.

The stock has a simple design with no unnecessary curves or shaping. Wood finish is generally good and smooth, with areas of  machine-made “checkering” on the forend and pistol grip to aid a good grip. 

The expected rubber buttpad seemed well-shaped and comfortable against the shoulder.

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

The Diana Outlaw uses a probe filling system to charge it with High Pressure Air. Personally, I’m not a fan of fill probes due to the lack of standardisation and potential opportunity for dirt to enter the gun through an open probe port. 

However, the Outlaw’s probe-filling system is by far the best I have yet seen!

Firstly, the probe itself has a standard “Foster” quick disconnect on the other end. This enables it to be connected directly to the standard female quick disconnect fitting found on HPA tanks and pumps without the usual, annoying need for an additional adapter. 

This makes it quick and easy to use, particularly for owners with other PCPs having a standard male fill nipple.

Secondly, the cover for the fill port is spring-loaded. It’s pulled forward to insert the fill probe, then released back after filling. This is a far better solution – in my opinion – than the more common separate screw-thread or push-in cover for the fill port.

The Diana Outlaw Is A Great Value Air Rifle!

Now there’s no chance of losing or dropping the cover and the fill port itself is automatically protected from the possible ingress of dirt! This is a first-rate feature that we have not seen on other PCP air rifles.

Overall, the Diana Outlaw may be the best $500 PCP air rifle in the market today. Airguns of Arizona has them in stock, so you can get yours today 🙂

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

For some years after their introduction, many manufacturers promoted gas ram air rifles as being unaffected by changes in temperature. The FPS would be pretty-well the same at any temperature, they said.

Is that true? Well, on the basis of some testing I’ve undertaken, the answer is definitely “no”. At least in the cold weather we have here in up-state New York.

I’ve found that here is definitely a change in FPS for gas ram air rifles at different temperatures. And it’s more than you may have thought!

To find out what the change in FPS can be with gas ram air rifles shooting at different temperatures, we used a new .177 caliber SIG ASP20.

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

We shot the ASP20 at a temperatures of both 20 degrees F and at 63 degrees F. In each case, the gun was allowed to “season” at the ambient temperature for several hours before shooting. This meant that gun and ambient temperature were definitely at the same.

Also, we shot the gun slowly – about every 30 seconds – for each test. This was to avoid any effects from the ASP20 heating-up as it was fired. We took 10 shots at both temperatures for each of the six types of pellets. Total 120 shots.

So what did we find?

The answer that – taking the SIG ASP20 as a representative of gas ram air rifles – the gun shot faster, on average, by 1.28 FPS per degree F at the higher temperature.

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

On average, that means approximately 55 FPS difference when the gun was shot at 20 degrees F and 63 degrees F. That is very definitely enough to make the point of impact on the target very different at most ranges.

So if you’re shooting gas ram air rifles, either on the range or hunting, make sure that your gun is sighted-in at approximately the same temperature as for that critical shot. If not, you could miss the target just due to the change in temperature!

Here’s a chart showing how the Muzzle Velocities changed with temperature for different .177 caliber pellets:

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

And here’s the average…

Does The FPS For Gas Ram Air Rifles Change With Temperature?

So if you’re shooting gas ram air rifles, either on the range or hunting, make sure that your airgun is sighted-in at approximately the same temperature as for that critical shot.

If not, you could miss the target just due to the change in temperature!

The first ever EBR Mexico 2019 has just finished. It was an outstanding success. All the competitors had a great time!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First Extreme Benchrest Mexico Competition

Alvaro López is the owner of Sun City Airguns of Hermosilio Sonora, Mexico. He deserves great credit for promoting, organizing and running this event. That’s Alvaro above, shooting the benchrest competition. He had fun, too.

As with the 2018 Extreme Benchrest competition in Arizona, Daystate and Brocock air rifles made some outstanding scores…

In the 50 Meter benchrest competition, Daystate Red Wolf HP air rifles placed first, second, fourth, sixth and ninth.

The 100 meter benchrest saw Daystate Red Wolf HP guns in second, fourth, seventh and ninth positions. In addition, Brocock Bantam Snipers placed third and fifth.

And a Daystate Red Wolf HP won the Speed Silhouette competition, too, in the hands of Alvaro’s son Sebastian (below).

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First Extreme Benchrest Mexico Competition

EBR Mexico featured Benchrest and Speed Silhouette competitions, with categories for both PCP and Spring air rifles. Prizes were offered to the winners, with up to 20,000 pesos for the winner of the Extreme Benchrest PCP finals.

Here’s the EBR Mexico 2019 winners. Congratulations, gentlemen!!!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

From left to right, they are…

– Gabriel Valenzuela – 65M spring rifle ( Benjamin Trail NP )

– Enrique Gómez – 100M EBR (FX Impact Mkll 30)

– Humberto López – 50M EBR ( Daystate Red Wolf HP 22)

– Sebastian López – speed silhouette ( Daystate Red Wolf 25 HP )

The 50 Meter benchrest competition was closely contested. Humberto López just pipped Sebastian López and Enrique Gómez, as we can see from the results below.

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

In the Speed Silhouette competition, the winners were (from left to right):
– Guillermo Días 2nd place
– Sebastian López 1st place
– Álvaro López 3rd place

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

Of course, the 100 Meter Extreme Benchrest competition was the highlight of EBR Mexico 2019. Those targets look a really long distance away!!!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

The Extreme Benchrest 100 M winners were, from left to right:
– Edgar Escalante 2nd ( Daystate Red Wolf 22)
– Enrique Gómez 1st place ( FX Impact Mkll 30)
– Jesus Rodríguez 3rd place ( Brocock Bantam Sniper 25 )

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition
Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

Great work Alvaro and all the Sun City Airguns team. Let’s hope that this was the first of a long line of annual EBR Mexico competitions!

Daystate And Brocock Dominate At First EBR Mexico Competition

BSA PCP air rifles have a long history of innovation and quality. But until recently the best and newest models from this famous British manufacturer were not available or supported in the USA.

This situation is changing, right now!

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

Precision Airgun Distribution has announced that the company is officially importing a range of new BSA regulated PCP air rifles direct from the Birmingham, UK, factory into the USA. That means that they are available from your favorite local dealers – including Airguns of Arizona.

Among these models are the innovative and compact BSA Defiant bullpup. This has a midships-mounted side lever action and sleek walnut stock. The Defiant provides 26 consistent shots of up to 30 Ft/Lbs muzzle energy per fill of the HPA tube.

That’s the Defiant, below.

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

Another interesting model is the BSA Ultra XL. This is a compact yet powerful PCP of conventional configuration. In addition, there’s the BSA Ultra JSR which is designed specifically for younger shooters of smaller stature.

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

The BSA Gold Star SE (above) is bolt action favorite that’s now available with a new, improved match trigger. It comes complete with an adjustable palm rest (or “hamster”) for Field Target shooting. This is another model that will be available through Airguns of Arizona.

All these air rifles will be available in “full power”, US specifications, with Muzzle energies up to 32 Ft/Lbs in .22 caliber.

The exception is the BSA Ultra JSR. This cute little air rifle is power-limited to 6 Ft/Lbs of muzzle energy . That’s due to its mission, which to appeal to enthusiastic younger shooters who are entering the exciting world of PCP air rifle shooting for the first time.

Exciting New BSA PCP Air Rifles Now Available From Airguns of Arizona!

“There’s a large demand for BSA PCP air rifles in the USA,” said Robert Buchanan, President of Precision Airgun Distribution. “This is because they combine distinctive design with high quality British manufacture. Now they will be readily available through Airguns of Arizona and Precision Airgun Distribution dealers across the country.”

Simon Moore, the Managing Director of BSA Guns Limited, endorsed this view. “We see a great future for the latest BSA PCP air rifles in the USA,” he said. “The Precision Airgun Distribution dealer network has many high quality, knowledgeable stores. They are a great resource to re-vitalize the BSA brand throughout the country and introduce our outstanding PCP air rifles to a new generation of enthusiastic airgunners.”

BSA PCP air rifles will be available in .177 and .22 calibers. They all benefit from the iconic in-house cold hammer forged barrel manufacturing that’s a specialty of this British airgun manufacturer.

Contact Airguns of Arizona for more details. These BSA air rifles are in stock today!

IWA Outdoor Classics is the major international outdoor industry trade show. It’s held annually in Nuremberg, Germany. As always, Daystate was a major exhibitor, together with its associated brands.

So, let’s take a look at the exciting new products from Daystate, Brocock and MTC Optics that were to be seen on the booth.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

Above we see Robert Buchanan from Airguns of Arizona with the new Daystate Red Wolf Safari that was being launched at IWA 2019. This version of the Red Wolf is distinguished externally by a new brown wood stock with unusually strong surface texture – you have to handle this yourself to understand what I mean!

But the real interest of the lies inside. For this is the first Daystate model to feature the new technologies that the company is developing as building-blocks for future designs. There’s a new Daystate ART barrel and Version 2 of the internal GCU – Gun Control Unit – circuit board.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

The GCU 2.0 system is an electronic control board, battery and other components. It provides infinitely variable control over the opening and closing of the air rifle’s firing valve. This makes multiple power level adjustments available, for example.

Of course, Daystate has been making electronically-controlled air rifles since 2003. The GCU 2.0 system shown at IWA 2019 is the latest iteration of their expertise in digital air rifle control.

Alongside this new control system is the Daystate ART barrel. ART is an abbreviation for Accuracy Research Team. It’s a new barrel system with outstanding claimed accuracy that’s been developed through a collaboration between Lothar Walther, together with shooters from Italy, the UK and Airguns of Arizona in the USA.

The ART barrel features a polygonal bore and slow-twist rifling. Daystate says that this reduces friction and optimizes pellet spin for improved downrange in-flight stability.

The designer of Daystate air rifles is the Italian Adriano Nodari. Here he is showing us the beautiful, limited edition Daystate Genus at the 2019 IWA show. Great work Adriano!!!

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

More new products from the Daystate group to be seen at IWA 2019 include the Brocock Concept Lite, with collapsible stock below…

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

… and the Brocock Bantam Sniper HP in a new laminated stock colorway. Robert Buchanan is delighted with both of them, as you can see!

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

MTC Optics is, of course, another part of the Daystate group. Sales Director Terence Logan showed me two new – and interesting scopes – that were being launched at IWA 2019.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

First was the MTC SWAT Prismatic. This is a fixed 12X riflescope with an extraordinarily wide field of view. In fact, Terence told me that it has the same field of view as a typical 4 x power scope.

With a large 50mm diameter objective (front) lens, the MTC SWAT Prismatic also promises to offer outstanding light-gathering capabilities. With that huge diameter tube, it also requires a very special mount, as you can see from the photograph above.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

The second new scope MTC Optics was showing at IWA 2019 was the 6-24×50 King Cobra F1. This has a first focal plane reticle and side focus parallax adjustment. It’s part of a clear trend towards first focal plane (FFP) scopes that is currently being seen in the airgun optics industry.

The Daystate/Brocock/MTC booth was also completely redesigned for IWA 2019. It had a stylish, minimalist look that focused attention on the new airguns.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition


The booth itself was located in the bright, airy and modern Hall 3A at IWA OutdoorClassics, along with a number of other top-tier players in the outdoor industry, as you can see from the overview below.

New Daystate Products Star At European Exhibition

Of course, you can expect to find these new products become available from Airguns of Arizona in the near future!

There’s a steadily-increasing number of First Focal Plane (FFP) riflescopes becoming available. But which is better, First or Second Focal Plane (SFP)?

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Most riflescopes used on air rifles have the reticle in what’s called the Second Focal Plane. But new technological developments are seeing the introduction of First Focal Plane scopes.

So should you choose a First or Second Focal Plane scope?

In the end, it’s down to a matter of personal choice. But – as many airgun shooters are not yet over-familiar with FFP scopes – it’s interesting to compare the effect of reticle placement inside the scope.

To make the comparison, we’re looking at two scopes from Aztec Optics. Apart from the reticle placement, they’re extremely similar. They have the same zoom range – 5.5 to 25 x – the same objective size – 50mm – and the same size tube, 30mm.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Moreover, they both have the same reticle pattern – called the DYND-1. The only really significant difference between the two models is the positioning of the reticle. This makes them ideal to compare that positioning – first or second focal plane.

To make the comparison clear, we took photographs through both FFP and SFP versions of the Aztec Optics 5.5-25 x 50 scopes. Deliberately, we conducted this comparison under poor lighting conditions.

The light was dull and overcast. We also aimed at some almost monochromatic tree trunks to make the challenge greater.

Here’s what we found…

First The Second Focal Plane Scope

Here’s the view through the SFP scope at 8x magnification.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

And here it is at 25 x magnification.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

As you can see, increasing the magnification magnifies the target. But the reticle stays the same size.

Next The First Focal Plane Scope

Now, let’s see the difference between First or Second Focal Plane reticle positioning…

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

This is the view through the SFP scope at 8x. The reticle is somewhat smaller than the SFP version at this magnification.

Now we have the FFP scope at 25x.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Wow, what a difference! The reticle has increased in size in proportion to the target. It’s clear that this makes aiming MUCH easier in these dull conditions.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Now if we switch on the illuminated reticle capability of the Aztec FFP scope, it’s even easier! (Red illumination is also available, should you prefer).

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

Most of us know how many reticle graduations (Mil Dot or MOA) to hold over – or under – to achieve a hit at a specific range when sighting through a scope.

But not so many of us have really thought seriously about how the value of those graduations can change when ta Second Focal Plane scope is zoomed. Because they do…

With a conventional SFP scope, this means that a mil dot graduation at 9x, for example, will have a much different value from that same mil dot in the same scope when at – say – 16 x zoom. That difference likely will cause a miss unless you are aware of that change.

The Aztec SFP scope has red marks on the zoom ring at 9x and 18x because these are the magnifications at which the reticle graduations can be used for holdover using Minutes of Angle (MOA).

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

In a first focal plane scope, the effect of a mil dot holdover is the same, whatever magnification is chosen in the zoom range. As we can see below, there’s no red marks on the zoom ring because the MOA graduations work for holdover at any magnification.

First Or Second Focal Plane Riflescope. Which Do You Prefer?

This makes the probability of a hit much higher if you use variable magnifications on your zoom scope.

The main benefit of FFP scopes will be found by hunters. In hunting, it’s often valuable to glass the area at low magnification and then zoom-in for the shot.

That advantage is a huge one where you use varying magnifications in your zoom scope and need to take quick shots.

If you always use use your scope at a fixed magnification, there’s no benefit however. That’s why first focal plane scopes are of little value to Field Target shooters, for example, who always use the same magnification, even though the distance to their target is unknown.

And, if you’re used to Second Focal Plane scopes – as most of us are – it’s a little disconcerting to see how large – and thick – the reticle grows on a first focal plane scope when it’s zoomed-in.

There’s a concern that the thicker apparent reticle till obscure the target or somehow “hide” it.

But these concerns are likely to fade with time and when they’re considered alongside the massive benefit of consistent effective mil dot holdover at any point in the zoom range.

So do you prefer the First or Second Focal Plane reticle? Either way, you can find your choice available at Airguns of Arizona!

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

Airguns of Arizona really specializes in high end air rifles from the likes of Brocock and Daystate. But they also sell a wide variety of other airguns – even BB pistols!

And let’s face it, we all like a little fun shooting occasionally! So today we’re looking at a new addition to the range of firearms-replica BB pistols: the Glock 19.

This BB gun has an unique benefit in the eyes of many shooters. It’s a Glock! It’s the first of the long-awaited range of Glock BB-firing replicas. That means a lot of Glock fans will want it. And so long as they accept it as a non-blowback action, they won’t be disappointed.

Non-blowback replica pistols are often regarded as inferior to blowback models. However they usually give an increased shot count and higher muzzle velocity than their blowback cousins. There’s also some evidence that they can be more accurate than replica BB pistols with extreme blowback.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

The Glock 19 BB gun offers great realism, high FPS, strong shot count, very good accuracy and a low price. It’s an an outstanding replica of the iconic firearm. And it’s just $70. How can you go wrong?

The look and feel of the Glock 19 are extremely good. This is an extremely close representation of the Glock 19 Generation 3 centerfire pistol – the compact version of the Glock 17.

Size and shape are all but identical to that of the Glock 19 firearm. Weight is very close, too.

The appearance and finish of the Glock 19 CO2 BB gun are outstanding! At any range beyond about three feet, it’s impossible to tell the difference between centerfire and BB gun versions.

Due to the realistic appearance of this product, handle it as you would a firearm. Do not display it in public or in any place where it could be mistaken for a cartridge firearm!

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

As a non-blowback version, the magazine release operates correctly, as does the trigger safety. But don’t expect the slide, slide release, slide lock, extractor etc to work. They’re fixed moldings.

The back strap of the Glock 19 BB gun is removable for loading 12 Gram CO2 cartridges. However, this deviation in design from the centerfire version is so well executed that it’s not objectionable in any way.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

This removable back strap also holds a folding hex key which is used to tighten the CO2 cartridge retaining screw. That screw is completely invisible in normal use as it’s covered by the base of the magazine.

Here we have another example of very careful and clever design being incorporated into the Glock 19 BB gun.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

Accuracy is very good by BB pistol standards. As remarked earlier, strong accuracy is more common in non-blowback replica BB pistols and the Glock 19 CO2 BB gun conforms to that pattern. You’ll have no problem hitting those soda cans every time at 6 yards. And most of the time at 10 yards, too!

The Muzzle Velocity claim is 410 FPS. We saw a peak 10-shot string average of 412 FPS at 70 degrees F with Crosman Copperhead BBs. The fastest individual shots recorded 420 FPS. This is very impressive performance for a BB pistol.

We know that all CO2-powered airguns shoot faster in warmer temperatures by about 2 FPS per degree F. This means that – taking that 412 FPS average – the expected FPS for the Glock 19 BB gun would be as high as 442 FPS at 85 degrees.

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

The Glock 19 gave us an excellent 96 shots before the Muzzle Velocity dropped down to 200 FPS. Again, very strong performance!

Accuracy and Point Of Impact were also both pretty consistent across the range of test BBs, although the Crosman Copperheads just nudged ahead in our testing.

The trigger of the Glock 19 CO2 BB gun is very close in pull weight to that of the firearm original. Glock gives a specification of 6 Lbs 5 Oz for the firearm. The Glock we tested recorded an average of 6 Lbs 4 Oz. It’s tough to get any better than that with any firearms replica!

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

The trigger features Glock’s iconic trigger blade safety. That works well in the Glock 19 BB gun.

BB and CO2 loading has been very well thought-out in this product. The CO2-tightening hex key is cleverly located in the removable backstrap and swivels for use.

There’s an easy-to-use BB follower catch and a well-proportioned BB loading port. Why can’t all BB guns be as easy to load as this?

And Now For Some BB Gun Fun! The Glock 19.

Go on! Treat yourself to a little BB gun fun with the Glock 19. You’ll be pleased you did!

For this report from the 2019 SHOT Show, we’ll take-in new products from Daystate and Brocock. There’s a lot of them and there’s more too…

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

A star attraction was the the new Brocock Patagonia PCP air rifle. This is a full production version of the Brocock Bantam Sniper HP model that was used to win the 2018 Extreme Benchrest by Claudio Flores. And that’s Claudio in our photograph with “his” air rifle. He certainly looks pleased with it!

Brocock had chosen the 2019 SHOT Show as the platform to launch this interesting new model

Why Patagonia? Well, Claudio’s company is called Patagonia Airguns. And this new airgun carries Claudio’s signature on the shroud, as we can see below

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

The Brocock Patagonia is available in both .22 and .25 calibers. There’s adjustable power levels up to 46 Ft/Lbs in .22 and 55 Ft/Lbs in .25 cal. With a Huma regulator, 460 cc carbon fiber HPA bottle and new 0dB silencer, this is the premier model in the semi-bullpup Brocock Bantam line

Meanwhile, Lauren Parsons shows us both Brocock Commander and Patagonia models

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

… and Tony Belas previews the Bantam Sniper Mini version of Brocock’s versatile Bantam range.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

Another new model seen on the Daystate/Brocock booth at the 2019 SHOT Show was a new version of the Daystate Pulsar. This electronically-controlled bullpup PCP has been equipped with the laminated hardwood colorway first seen on the Daystate Saxon limited edition model form a couple of years ago.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

Greg Glover shows us this to us. Again, the new Daystate 0dB silencer is fitted to further mute this shrouded air rifle’s report.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)
The water cooled Omega TrailCharger also takes an innovative approach to managing the connecting cables, as is visible in this rear view.

Another interesting new product to be seen at the Daystate/Brocock booth at the 2019 SHOT Show was this new Omega Trailcharger HPA compressor. It’s imported into the US by Airguns of Arizona.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

This compressor is can be powered by mains electricity (using the supplied transformer) or from a vehicle 12 Volt DC battery. Unlike most similar portable HPA compressors, however, it’s designed to be able to fill HPA tanks and not just PCP airguns directly. The Street Price will be $799, which is attractive for an HPA compressor of this capability

The water cooled Omega TrailCharger also takes an innovative approach to managing the connecting cables, as is visible in the rear view, above.

New Products From Daystate And Brocock At The 2019 SHOT Show (And More…)

As we can see from the photograph above, the TrailCharger is considerably smaller and lighter than the well-known Omega TurboCharger which sits next to it on the right.

Phew! That’s lots of new stuff. Look for it to become available from Airguns of Arizona in the near future…

The 2019 SHOT Show will be with us very soon now. So, before it happens, I’ll take a risk and make some predictions for what I think we may see there…

THE FUTURE FOR PCP AIR RIFLES.

At the 2017 SHOT Show, everyone was talking about the Umarex Gauntlet, a revolutionary $300, magazine-fed, regulated PCP air rifle with a great shot count. The announcement of this gun created a huge buzz among airgunners and airgun companies across the US and beyond.

An Airgun Industry Crystal Ball

What the Umarex Gauntlet established was the $300 price floor for a “good enough” quality, regulated PCP air rifle. During 2017, we saw Gamo, Benjamin and others reducing the prices of their PCPs to get close to that magic $300 number. And at the 2018 SHOT Show, there were more $300 magazine-fed PCPs launched – the Benjamin Fortitude and Hatsan Flash among them. I expect to see more this year.

Furthermore, just about every new $300+ PCP launched since the Gauntlet has been regulated.

Currently, these guns have bolt actions. But semi-autos will become more common in future, I believe. In a few years time, the typical $300 regulated, magazine-fed PCP air rifle will also be semi-automatic. Will that start to happen at the 2019 SHOT Show? We’ll see…

WHAT ABOUT BREAK BARRELS?

As HPA compressors become smaller, lighter and cheaper, the barriers to PCP ownership will clearly be reduced. In fact, I believe that they will cause the traditional, single shot break barrel air rifle – to become an endangered species.

Now I do not think that break barrel, single shot springers (or gas rams) will ever disappear. But I do predict that there will be fewer of them sold in future. Mostly, they will retreat slowly back down to the lowest reaches of the US airgun market at prices of $150 or less. Even there, they will be challenged by multi-shot CO2-powered guns.

I also predict that a few, specialist, break barrel (or underlever) single shot springers will survive at the top end of the market, say $500 and above. But these will be the choice of real enthusiasts and a few diehard traditionalists, those “real men” who want to experience “airguns as they used to be”. Think Weihrauch and SIG SAUER ASP20 (below).

An Airgun Industry Crystal Ball

So I predict the current huge range of springers in the $150 – $300 range will fade away and die out over the next few years. They will be steadily squeezed out by increasingly easy-to-use (and cheap) rapid-firing PCP and CO2 guns.

CO2 STRIKES BACK.

CO2-powered airguns are making a big comeback! Many, many airgunners are falling for the charms of rapid-firing firearms replica airguns. Yes, many of these are BB guns and most of them are pistols.

CO2-powered airguns offer “realism” and they offer rapid fire capability. The SIG SAUER MPX and MCX models are a prime example of this trend. They’re hugely successful because they really look the part, fire semi-auto and do not require expensive HPA charging kit. That’s the MPX below.

An Airgun Industry Crystal Ball

This interest in CO2 power is driven, I believe, by a new type of airgunner. They don’t want single shot, hard-recoiling, hard-cocking, Zillion FPS, tough-to-shoot break barrel springers. They want a different type of shooting experience that’s closer to that of firearms (or airsoft, for that matter), but at a lower cost, with shorter range potential and less noise.

I expect to see more CO2-powered firearms replica airguns appear in 2019.

BIG BORE. BIG OPPORTUNITY?

My real question is: “How big is that big bore airgun market”?

Big bore airguns – .30 caliber and above – have been big news in the past few years.

Of course, big bore air rifles use air at a huge rate. This means that you’ll certainly need your own HPA compressor and a very large intermediate tank. In money terms, a big bore requires a $800+ tank and $1,000+ home compressor. Oh, and add-in a $400+ scope. That total rapidly climbs North of $4,000 for a functioning big bore hunting air rifle.

Walking around the SHOT Show, it’s very clear that $4,000 will buy any one of a large number of superb firearm hunting rifles. They’re more powerful, less complicated and require just a box of cartridges to shoot.

So, my prediction is that very high power – say over 200 Ft/Lbs Muzzle Energy – big bore air rifles will remain a niche market.

I believe the cost/complexity/performance envelope of big bore airguns will remain a rarified “enthusiast only” world with a very limited number of users. Unless you already have a tank and compressor for your smallbore PCPs.

Such very high power big bore airguns will continue to attract attention. But the economics probably favor smaller, specialist manufacturers than the biggest players. Look no further than the Western Big Bore Bushbuck, for example.

An Airgun Industry Crystal Ball

So, there’s my predictions for the future of the airgun market…

Overall I believe that, in the next few years, more people will make more shots, firing faster with airguns. Single-shot airguns will become either very cheap, a specialist’s choice or history. Large volume airgun sales in the future belong to magazine-fed, HPA and CO2 airguns with calibers of about .30 and below. Especially those which look like military firearms.

But there again, I could be wrong. According to my wife, I usually am! What do you think?